• Protesters gather at an encampment on Saturday, Nov. 26, 2016, a day after tribal leaders received a letter from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that told them the federal land would be closed to the public on Dec. 5, near Cannon Ball, N.D. The protesters said Saturday that they do not plan to leave and will continue to oppose construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline. (AP photo/James MacPherson)

    Protesters gather at an encampment on Saturday, Nov. 26, 2016, a day after tribal leaders received a letter from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that told them the federal land would be closed to the public on Dec. 5, near Cannon Ball, N.D. The ... protesters said Saturday that they do not plan to leave and will continue to oppose construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline. (AP photo/James MacPherson) (The Associated Press)

  • Protesters gather at an encampment on Saturday, Nov. 26, 2016, a day after tribal leaders received a letter from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that told them the federal land would be closed to the public on Dec. 5, near Cannon Ball, N.D. The protesters said Saturday that they do not plan to leave and will continue to oppose construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline. (AP photo/James MacPherson)

    Protesters gather at an encampment on Saturday, Nov. 26, 2016, a day after tribal leaders received a letter from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that told them the federal land would be closed to the public on Dec. 5, near Cannon Ball, N.D. The ... protesters said Saturday that they do not plan to leave and will continue to oppose construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline. (AP photo/James MacPherson) (The Associated Press)

  • In this Nov. 24, 2016 photo, people stand on the edge of Cantapeta Creek near the growing Sacred Stones Overflow Protest Camp in Morton County, N.D. The leader of the Cheyenne River Sioux in South Dakota is calling for all opponents of the Dakota Access oil pipeline to boycott businesses in North Dakota's capital city.  (Tom Stromme/Bismarck Tribune via AP)

    In this Nov. 24, 2016 photo, people stand on the edge of Cantapeta Creek near the growing Sacred Stones Overflow Protest Camp in Morton County, N.D. The leader of the Cheyenne River Sioux in South Dakota is calling for all opponents of the Dakota ... Access oil pipeline to boycott businesses in North Dakota's capital city. (Tom Stromme/Bismarck Tribune via AP) (The Associated Press)

Republican senator: Pipeline protesters should leave camp

Markets Associated Press

North Dakota U.S. Sen. John Hoeven says opponents of the Dakota Access oil pipeline should respect the law and leave the protest area.

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The Republican made the statement after the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers sent a letter Friday to Standing Rock Sioux tribal chairman Dave Archambault that said the federal land about 50 miles south of Bismarck on which the vast majority of protesters have gathered at the Oceti Sakowin camp will close Dec. 5.

Archambault says the letter cites the oncoming winter and confrontations between protesters and police. He also says, "our resolve to protect our water is stronger than ever."

Hoeven is calling for the Obama administration to approve the easement for the pipeline, saying the situation needs to be resolved.