• In this Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016, photo, Luincys Fernandez demonstrates how she had used the AeroForm handheld dosage controller during an interview at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center. Doctors are testing the device that would let women contribute to the breast reconstruction process at home. It is aimed at not only making treatment more comfortable and convenient, but also giving women a sense of control _ something cancer often takes away. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

    In this Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016, photo, Luincys Fernandez demonstrates how she had used the AeroForm handheld dosage controller during an interview at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center. Doctors are testing the device that would ... let women contribute to the breast reconstruction process at home. It is aimed at not only making treatment more comfortable and convenient, but also giving women a sense of control _ something cancer often takes away. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) (The Associated Press)

  • This Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 photo shows the AeroForm tissue expander, left, and handheld dosage controller at the NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center. Doctors are testing the device that would let women contribute to the breast reconstruction process at home. It is aimed at not only making treatment more comfortable and convenient, but also giving women a sense of control _ something cancer often takes away. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

    This Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 photo shows the AeroForm tissue expander, left, and handheld dosage controller at the NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center. Doctors are testing the device that would let women contribute to the breast ... reconstruction process at home. It is aimed at not only making treatment more comfortable and convenient, but also giving women a sense of control _ something cancer often takes away. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) (The Associated Press)

  • In this Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016, photo, Dr. Jeffrey Ascherman, chief of the Division of Plastic Surgery and professor of surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center, holds an AeroForm kit during an interview in New York. Doctors are testing the device that would let women contribute to the breast reconstruction process at home. It is aimed at not only making treatment more comfortable and convenient, but also giving women a sense of control _ something cancer often takes away. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

    In this Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016, photo, Dr. Jeffrey Ascherman, chief of the Division of Plastic Surgery and professor of surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center, holds an AeroForm kit during an interview in New York. ... Doctors are testing the device that would let women contribute to the breast reconstruction process at home. It is aimed at not only making treatment more comfortable and convenient, but also giving women a sense of control _ something cancer often takes away. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) (The Associated Press)

DIY breast reconstruction: Device lets women do part at home

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Doctors are testing a device that would let women do part of their breast reconstruction at home.

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It's not only aimed at making treatment more comfortable and convenient, but also giving a sense of control to women who've had a cancerous breast removed.

Usually saline injections are used to inflate a pouch under the skin to make room for a permanent implant. That means frequent trips to the doctor. The new device uses a remote control that activates a tiny cartridge inside the pouch to pump gas.

The device is sold in Australia, approved in Europe and under review now by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.