Judge approves Volkswagen emissions settlement

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  • FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2015, file photo, the amount of carbon dioxide emissions is written on a Volkswagen Passat Diesel at the Frankfurt Car Show in Frankfurt, Germany. A federal judge in San Francisco is facing a deadline on whether to approve a nearly $15 billion deal over Volkswagen's emissions cheating scandal that gives most affected car owners the option of having the company buy back their vehicles. U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer said at a hearing last week that he was strongly inclined to give the deal final approval and would issue a ruling by Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, File)

    FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2015, file photo, the amount of carbon dioxide emissions is written on a Volkswagen Passat Diesel at the Frankfurt Car Show in Frankfurt, Germany. A federal judge in San Francisco is facing a deadline on whether to approve a ... nearly $15 billion deal over Volkswagen's emissions cheating scandal that gives most affected car owners the option of having the company buy back their vehicles. U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer said at a hearing last week that he was strongly inclined to give the deal final approval and would issue a ruling by Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, File) (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Oct. 13, 2015, file photo, a Volkswagen Touareg diesel is tested in the Environmental Protection Agency's cold temperature test facility in Ann Arbor, Mich. A federal judge in San Francisco is facing a deadline on whether to approve a nearly $15 billion deal over Volkswagen's emissions cheating scandal that gives most affected car owners the option of having the company buy back their vehicles. U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer said at a hearing last week that he was strongly inclined to give the deal final approval and would issue a ruling by Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)

    FILE - In this Oct. 13, 2015, file photo, a Volkswagen Touareg diesel is tested in the Environmental Protection Agency's cold temperature test facility in Ann Arbor, Mich. A federal judge in San Francisco is facing a deadline on whether to approve a ... nearly $15 billion deal over Volkswagen's emissions cheating scandal that gives most affected car owners the option of having the company buy back their vehicles. U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer said at a hearing last week that he was strongly inclined to give the deal final approval and would issue a ruling by Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File) (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this July 19, 2016, file photo, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announces a lawsuit against Volkswagen in New York. A federal judge in San Francisco is facing a deadline on whether to approve a nearly $15 billion deal over Volkswagen's emissions cheating scandal that gives most affected car owners the option of having the company buy back their vehicles. U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer said at a hearing last week that he was strongly inclined to give the deal final approval and would issue a ruling by Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

    FILE - In this July 19, 2016, file photo, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announces a lawsuit against Volkswagen in New York. A federal judge in San Francisco is facing a deadline on whether to approve a nearly $15 billion deal over ... Volkswagen's emissions cheating scandal that gives most affected car owners the option of having the company buy back their vehicles. U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer said at a hearing last week that he was strongly inclined to give the deal final approval and would issue a ruling by Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File) (The Associated Press)

A federal judge in San Francisco has approved a $15 billion court settlement of most claims against Volkswagen for its emissions-cheating scandal.

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U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer signed the order Tuesday approving the largest auto-scandal settlement in the nation's history.

About 475,000 owners of VWs and Audis with 2-liter four-cylinder diesel engines now will be able to seek buybacks of their vehicles starting next Tuesday.

Most of the owners are expected to sell their cars back to VW after the company acknowledged cheating on emissions testing and putting dirty cars on the road. In addition to having their cars bought back, owners can each get payments of $5,100 to $10,000.