• Japan Anime Tourism Association officials, from left, Kadokawa Corp. Chairman and the association's Vice Chairman Tsuguhiko Kadokawa, Chairman Yoshiyuki Tomino, Director Yasuhiro Tsuboi, Director Tadashi Fujita and Director and Secretary General Yoshifumi Mori attend a press conference on the newly formed association in Tokyo, Friday, Sept. 16, 2016 while showing an image of a Japanese TV animation series, "Lucky Star" or "Raki Suta" on the screen. Eighty-eight places in Japan are going to be designated "animation spots" to encourage tourism - the train station, school campus, rural shrine and other fairly everyday places where popular "manga" characters were depicted. Japanese on the screen read: "Raki Sta," Kuki city in Saitama prefecture, a preceding example of the "animation spot." (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)

    Japan Anime Tourism Association officials, from left, Kadokawa Corp. Chairman and the association's Vice Chairman Tsuguhiko Kadokawa, Chairman Yoshiyuki Tomino, Director Yasuhiro Tsuboi, Director Tadashi Fujita and Director and Secretary General ... Yoshifumi Mori attend a press conference on the newly formed association in Tokyo, Friday, Sept. 16, 2016 while showing an image of a Japanese TV animation series, "Lucky Star" or "Raki Suta" on the screen. Eighty-eight places in Japan are going to be designated "animation spots" to encourage tourism - the train station, school campus, rural shrine and other fairly everyday places where popular "manga" characters were depicted. Japanese on the screen read: "Raki Sta," Kuki city in Saitama prefecture, a preceding example of the "animation spot." (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara) (The Associated Press)

  • CORRECTS TITLES - Japan Anime Tourism Association Chairman Yoshiyuki Tomino, right, speaks as Kadokawa Corp. Chairman and the association's Vice Chairman Tsuguhiko Kadokawa listens during a press conference to announce the establishment of the association in Tokyo, Friday, Sept. 16, 2016. Eighty-eight places in Japan are going to be designated "animation spots" to encourage tourism - the train station, school campus, rural shrine and other fairly everyday places where popular "manga" characters were depicted. Officials said Friday they will compile a travel route of 88 animation spots by December, including where manga and animation works took place, as well as the homes of manga artists and museums dedicated to their works. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)

    CORRECTS TITLES - Japan Anime Tourism Association Chairman Yoshiyuki Tomino, right, speaks as Kadokawa Corp. Chairman and the association's Vice Chairman Tsuguhiko Kadokawa listens during a press conference to announce the establishment of the ... association in Tokyo, Friday, Sept. 16, 2016. Eighty-eight places in Japan are going to be designated "animation spots" to encourage tourism - the train station, school campus, rural shrine and other fairly everyday places where popular "manga" characters were depicted. Officials said Friday they will compile a travel route of 88 animation spots by December, including where manga and animation works took place, as well as the homes of manga artists and museums dedicated to their works. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara) (The Associated Press)

  • A man walks by an eatery with its facade painted with letters that read "Welcome to Washinomiya" and the characters of a TV animation series "Lucky Star" or "Raki Sta" near Washinomiya Jinja shrine in Kuki, Saitama prefecture, north of Tokyo, Friday, Sept. 16, 2016. Eighty-eight places in Japan are going to be designated "animation spots" to encourage tourism — using train stations, school campuses, rural shrines and other fairly everyday places where popular "manga" characters are depicted. One shoo-in for the list, according to organizers, is Washinomiya Jinja, a picturesque shrine, which is a familiar scene in the comic by Kagami Yoshimizu, which later became the TV animation series. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

    A man walks by an eatery with its facade painted with letters that read "Welcome to Washinomiya" and the characters of a TV animation series "Lucky Star" or "Raki Sta" near Washinomiya Jinja shrine in Kuki, Saitama prefecture, north of Tokyo, Friday, ... Sept. 16, 2016. Eighty-eight places in Japan are going to be designated "animation spots" to encourage tourism — using train stations, school campuses, rural shrines and other fairly everyday places where popular "manga" characters are depicted. One shoo-in for the list, according to organizers, is Washinomiya Jinja, a picturesque shrine, which is a familiar scene in the comic by Kagami Yoshimizu, which later became the TV animation series. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko) (The Associated Press)

Japan choosing 88 animation travel spots to boost tourism

Markets Associated Press

Eighty-eight places in Japan are going to be designated "animation spots" to encourage tourism — using train stations, school campuses, rural shrines and other fairly everyday places where popular "manga" characters are depicted.

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Such landmarks number in the tens of thousands, given the popularity and volume of "manga" comics In Japan. But this is being billed as the official list for any fan's animation "pilgrimage."

People around the world can vote on the landmarks through a website set up in several languages, including English and Chinese.

Officials behind the new Japan Anime Tourism Association said Friday they will compile a travel route of 88 animation spots by December, including where manga and animation works took place, as well as the homes of manga artists and museums dedicated to their works.