• In this Sept. 22, 2015 photo a VW logo is reflected in a puddle at the Volkswagen headquarters in Wolfsburg, northern Germany. Volkswagen AG's smog-test scandal escalated Tuesday as the company acknowledged putting stealth software in millions of vehicles worldwide.  (Julian Stratenschulte/dpa via AP)

    In this Sept. 22, 2015 photo a VW logo is reflected in a puddle at the Volkswagen headquarters in Wolfsburg, northern Germany. Volkswagen AG's smog-test scandal escalated Tuesday as the company acknowledged putting stealth software in millions of ... vehicles worldwide. (Julian Stratenschulte/dpa via AP) (The Associated Press)

  • The VW Logo is photographed at a car  at the Car Show in Frankfurt, Germany, Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2015. Volkswagen has   admitted that it intentionally installed software programmed to switch engines to a cleaner mode during official emissions testing.  The software then switches off again, enabling cars to drive more powerfully on the road while emitting as much as 40 times the legal pollution limit. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)

    The VW Logo is photographed at a car at the Car Show in Frankfurt, Germany, Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2015. Volkswagen has admitted that it intentionally installed software programmed to switch engines to a cleaner mode during official emissions testing. ... The software then switches off again, enabling cars to drive more powerfully on the road while emitting as much as 40 times the legal pollution limit. (AP Photo/Michael Probst) (The Associated Press)

  • The amount of carbon dioxide emission is written on a Volkswagen Passat Diesel at the Frankfurt Car Show in Frankfurt, Germany, Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2015. Volkswagen has   admitted that it intentionally installed software programmed to switch engines to a cleaner mode during official emissions testing.  The software then switches off again, enabling cars to drive more powerfully on the road while emitting as much as 40 times the legal pollution limit. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)

    The amount of carbon dioxide emission is written on a Volkswagen Passat Diesel at the Frankfurt Car Show in Frankfurt, Germany, Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2015. Volkswagen has admitted that it intentionally installed software programmed to switch engines ... to a cleaner mode during official emissions testing. The software then switches off again, enabling cars to drive more powerfully on the road while emitting as much as 40 times the legal pollution limit. (AP Photo/Michael Probst) (The Associated Press)

Volkswagen shares slide again as company scrambles to contain emissions scandal fallout

Stocks Associated Press

Shares in Volkswagen AG are heading south for a third consecutive day as the automaker scrambles to contain its widening emissions-rigging scandal.

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Volkswagen's share price fell 4 percent to 101.75 euros in early Frankfurt trading Wednesday. The fall follows declines of 17 percent and 20 percent in the first two days of the trading week.

On Tuesday, VW said 11 million of its diesel vehicles worldwide contain software that can evade emissions controls, far more than the 482,000 cars identified by U.S. authorities as violating clean air laws.

CEO Martin Winterkorn said he was "endlessly sorry" and asked in a video message for "your trust on our way forward." Questions remain about his future.

The executive committee of Volkswagen's supervisory board is expected to discuss the scandal Wednesday.