• Republican presidential candidate, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, gives a foreign policy speech on the campus of The Citadel, Friday, Aug. 28, 2015, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)

    Republican presidential candidate, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, gives a foreign policy speech on the campus of The Citadel, Friday, Aug. 28, 2015, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Mic Smith) (The Associated Press)

  • Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump answers questions from the media after speaking at a rally at the TD Convention Center, Thursday, Aug.  27, 2015, in Greenville, S.C. (AP Photo/Richard Shiro)

    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump answers questions from the media after speaking at a rally at the TD Convention Center, Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015, in Greenville, S.C. (AP Photo/Richard Shiro) (The Associated Press)

Experts: GOP candidates' tough talk doesn't always square with facts of US-China relationship

Economic Indicators Associated Press

If there was ever a week for the Republican presidential candidates to promise to get tough on China, this was it: Spurred by the stock market's wild ride, they lashed out at the world's most populous nation.

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Scott Walker demanded President Barack Obama cancel an upcoming state visit with Chinese President Xi Jinping (shee jihn-peeng). Donald Trump said the U.S. needs to "do a big uncoupling pretty soon, before it's too late."

But some experts say that rhetoric doesn't square with the realities of the relationship between the world's two largest economies — even if it makes for nifty campaign sound bites.

Jon Huntsman is a former Republican governor of Utah and U.S. ambassador to China. He says China-bashing is a surefire applause in Republican primaries but unrealistic.