Legislative session included numerous bills affecting everyday life of New Yorkers

College Planning Associated Press

During their six-month session, state lawmakers have taken up several bills affecting the everyday lives of New Yorkers. Here are some of them:

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— RENT REGULATIONS: One of the session's biggest issues, the renewal of the longstanding law governing the rents paid by more than 2 million tenants in and around New York City briefly expired when lawmakers couldn't agree on an extension. Democrats want stronger protections for tenants; Republicans want income verification checks to ensure people aren't cheating the system. Lawmakers say they hope to work out a deal by Tuesday.

— PREGNANCY AND INSURANCE: Lawmakers signed off on legislation that would make pregnancy an event allowing immediate enrollment in commercial insurance plans either on or off New York's health exchange. Existing enrollment periods are generally limited, with exceptions for "qualifying events" like marriage, divorce, citizenship or birth. The bill would take effect next year if signed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

— DINING WITH DOGS: Lawmakers voted to allow dog owners to bring their leashed animals to outdoor restaurant dining areas, so long as the restaurant supports the policy.

— CAMPUS SEXUAL ASSAULT: Cuomo intends to sign legislation he proposed that would impose a new campus sexual assault policy on the state's private colleges and universities. The measure includes a "yes means yes" definition of sexual consent requiring a clear, affirmative agreement between partners. It also creates a victim's bill of rights and boosts training for law enforcement, students and administrators. The policy was implemented at public colleges last year.

— NAIL SALONS: Lawmakers and Cuomo reached a deal on a bill to protect workers in nail salons by authorizing New York's Department of State to shut down those that break the law. Lawmakers say many workers face unsafe conditions and unfair practices like inadequate ventilation, lack of protective equipment, unpaid wages, lack of worker's compensation coverage, absent business liability insurance and unlicensed facilities.

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— EDUCATION: The budget passed by lawmakers includes $23.5 billion in total school aid, representing an increase of $1.4 billion. Cuomo has also proposed a plan, still awaiting legislative approval, to create a tax credit for private school tuition and donations to public schools — as well as $100 million more for struggling upstate schools.

— MEDICAL MARIJUANA: Lawmakers agreed to speed up the state's new medical marijuana program to give critically ill patients expedited access to pot until the full program is up and running next year.

— DREAM ACT: The proposal to extend financial aid to students in the country illegally failed again this year despite backing from Cuomo and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio.

— MINIMUM WAGE: Efforts to raise the state's minimum wage were blocked in the Senate, though Cuomo convened a state Wage Board to consider granting a wage increase to fast-food workers. Its decision, which could be implemented without legislative approval, is expected this summer.

— PALM SUNDAY RACING: The Legislature voted to remove Palm Sunday from the list of days when horse racing is prohibited in New York, leaving only Christmas and Easter.

— NURSING MOMS: Nursing mothers will have the right to reasonable, unpaid breaks to pump breast milk for up to three years after childbirth.