WSJ.com What's News - Worldwide News Briefs for Aug 02

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OPEC'S 'CATCH-22': HOW TO UNWIND ITS DEAL TO CUT OIL OUTPUT

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OPEC and other big oil producers are facing a new high-wire act: how to keep the oil market calm if they decide to lift their output curbs and ramp production back up.

SOUTH KOREA PLANS TAX RAISE TO FUND MINIMUM WAGE

South Korea's left-leaning government is planning to raise taxes on wealthy individuals and large companies, the first increase in the country's corporate-tax rate since 1991, as President Moon Jae-in seeks to fund a massive expansion in public-sector hiring.

SWITZERLAND'S FIRST-WORLD PROBLEM: WHAT TO DO WITH $750 BILLION

The Swiss central bank's $750 billion in foreign-currency reserves has sparked a lively debate over how the money should be invested.

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U.S. PLANS TRADE MEASURES AGAINST CHINA

The Trump administration is planning trade measures to force Beijing to crack down on intellectual-property theft and ease requirements that American companies share advanced technologies to gain entry to the Chinese market.

RWANDA'S SUCCESS STORY ADDS A DARK NEW CHAPTER

Paul Kagame is certain to secure a third term in Rwanda's presidential election on Friday, but cracks in the strongman's armor are starting to appear, as the coffee-fueled economy loses steam and rights groups say intimidation and oppression tar a state-building success story.

STOLEN EMAILS SHOW TIES BETWEEN ENVOY AND CENTRAL 1MDB FIGURE

Newly released emails show a relationship between the United Arab Emirates' ambassador to the U.S. and Jho Low, a Malaysian financier U.S. law-enforcement officials say is at the center of a $4.5 billion misappropriation from a Malaysian state fund.

BRAZIL'S CORRUPTION PROBE FACES ITS BIGGEST TEST CASE: THE PRESIDENT

Brazil's Congress is scheduled to begin voting on whether to put President Michel Temer on trial for alleged graft, as the far-reaching Car Wash inquiry reaches the highest levels of government.

TANZANIA'S TOUGHER MINING LAWS RATTLE COMPANIES

International miners that flocked to Tanzania for its low taxes and friendly laws are running up against a populist president eager to gain a greater share of mining revenue for the African nation.

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(END) Dow Jones Newswires

August 02, 2017 17:21 ET (21:21 GMT)