Social mediation: Politicians bypass press, control message

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  • President-elect Donald Trump speaks during a rally at the Giant Center, Thursday, Dec. 15, 2016, in Hershey, Pa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

    President-elect Donald Trump speaks during a rally at the Giant Center, Thursday, Dec. 15, 2016, in Hershey, Pa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Nov. 16, 2016 file photo, Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner speaks to reporters in Springfield, Ill. Gov. Rauner has eliminated a backlog of more than 2,000 clemency requests he inherited from previous administrations. The Republican said Monday, Dec. 12, 2016, acting on the requests is part of his effort to improve Illinois' criminal justice system and help people convicted of crimes go on to lead productive lives. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman File)

    FILE - In this Nov. 16, 2016 file photo, Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner speaks to reporters in Springfield, Ill. Gov. Rauner has eliminated a backlog of more than 2,000 clemency requests he inherited from previous administrations. The Republican said ... Monday, Dec. 12, 2016, acting on the requests is part of his effort to improve Illinois' criminal justice system and help people convicted of crimes go on to lead productive lives. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman File) (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Nov. 16, 2016 file photo, Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner speaks in Springfield, Ill. Rauner usually takes questions from reporters after press conferences, but in recent months he's also begun hosting Facebook Live events, answering questions from the public about policies he's advocating for during his budget struggle with Democrats. A strategy that's been used by more tech-savvy states and increasingly becoming popular among new-to-politics officeholders, such as President-elect Donald Trump, who needs only Twitter to share his thoughts. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman File)

    FILE - In this Nov. 16, 2016 file photo, Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner speaks in Springfield, Ill. Rauner usually takes questions from reporters after press conferences, but in recent months he's also begun hosting Facebook Live events, answering ... questions from the public about policies he's advocating for during his budget struggle with Democrats. A strategy that's been used by more tech-savvy states and increasingly becoming popular among new-to-politics officeholders, such as President-elect Donald Trump, who needs only Twitter to share his thoughts. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman File) (The Associated Press)

North Dakota's new governor delivered his first extensive remarks on the contentious Dakota Access oil pipeline in a Facebook video that spared him having to answer questions from reporters.

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The setup Thursday allowed Republican Gov. Doug Burgum to convey his thoughts unfiltered and unchallenged by the press.

It's a strategy that's been used by more tech-savvy states and becoming increasingly popular among new-to-politics officeholders. President-elect Donald Trump has needed only Twitter to share his thoughts widely.

Burgum's video, Trump's tweets and Illinois Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner's Facebook Live events illustrate how politicians to use social media platforms to announce or react to events in a controlled setting and bypass any questions from media.