• In this Sunday, Nov. 27, 2016, photo, participants from Taiwan watch their robots playing a soccer match during the World Robot Olympiad in New Delhi, India. The weekend games brought more than 450 teams of students from 50 countries to the Indian capital. (AP Photo/Tsering Topgyal)

    In this Sunday, Nov. 27, 2016, photo, participants from Taiwan watch their robots playing a soccer match during the World Robot Olympiad in New Delhi, India. The weekend games brought more than 450 teams of students from 50 countries to the Indian ... capital. (AP Photo/Tsering Topgyal) (The Associated Press)

  • In this Sunday, Nov. 27, 2016 photo, a participant from Greece gets his robot ready for a game of soccer at the World Robot Olympiad in New Delhi, India. The weekend games brought more than 450 teams of students from 50 countries to the Indian capital. (AP Photo/Tsering Topgyal)

    In this Sunday, Nov. 27, 2016 photo, a participant from Greece gets his robot ready for a game of soccer at the World Robot Olympiad in New Delhi, India. The weekend games brought more than 450 teams of students from 50 countries to the Indian ... capital. (AP Photo/Tsering Topgyal) (The Associated Press)

  • In this Sunday, Nov. 27, 2016 photo, a participant is seen at the World Robot Olympiad in New Delhi, India. The weekend games brought more than 450 teams of students from 50 countries to the Indian capital. The idea is to teach children computer programing at a young age. (AP Photo/Tsering Topgyal)

    In this Sunday, Nov. 27, 2016 photo, a participant is seen at the World Robot Olympiad in New Delhi, India. The weekend games brought more than 450 teams of students from 50 countries to the Indian capital. The idea is to teach children computer ... programing at a young age. (AP Photo/Tsering Topgyal) (The Associated Press)

World students face off in robot games in India

Features Associated Press

Two Taiwanese teenagers have won the prize for best soccer-playing robots at this year's World Robot Olympiad.

Continue Reading Below

One of the winners, Liaw Jia-wun, said Sunday that he and his teammate "never in our lives could think that we would win the world championship."

The weekend games brought more than 450 teams of students from 50 countries to the Indian capital. The idea is to teach children computer programing at a young age. Each team of two or three people made and programed robots using Lego parts.

Some participants were as young as 6 years old. Some at 25 years old were near university graduation.