New York's MoMA acquires original set of emojis

Features Associated Press

This photo provided by The Museum of Modern Art in New York shows the original set of 176 emojis, which the museum has acquired. The emojis were a gift to the museum from the phone company, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone. (Shigetaka Kurita/NTT DoCoMo/Courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art)

This photo provided by The Museum of Modern Art in New York shows the original set of 176 emojis, which the museum has acquired. The emojis were a gift to the museum from the phone company, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone. (Shigetaka Kurita/NTT DoCoMo/... Courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art) (The Associated Press)

Back in the day, before cars could drive themselves and phones could send stickers and animations, a Japanese phone company released a set of 176 emojis.

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The year was 1999 and the tiny 12-by-12 pixel designs — smiley faces, hearts of the intact and broken variety, cats, and so on — were mainly popular in Japan. In 2010, Unicode Consortium, which now controls emoji standards, translated the emoji into the Unicode standard, which means that a person in France, for example, can send an emoji to a person in the U.S. and it will look the same.

New York's Museum of Modern Art says it has acquired original set of 176 emojis. They were a gift to the museum from the phone company, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone.