US accuses Russia of hacking political sites

Features Associated Press

  • In this Oct. 4, 2016 photo, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry pauses, during a speech at an event hosted by The German Marshall Fund (GMF) and the U.S. Mission to the EU at Concert Noble in Brussels.  Kerry called Friday for Russia and Syria to face a war crimes investigation for their attacks on Syrian civilians, further illustrating the downward spiral in relations between Washington and Moscow.
 (AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert)

    In this Oct. 4, 2016 photo, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry pauses, during a speech at an event hosted by The German Marshall Fund (GMF) and the U.S. Mission to the EU at Concert Noble in Brussels. Kerry called Friday for Russia and Syria to face ... a war crimes investigation for their attacks on Syrian civilians, further illustrating the downward spiral in relations between Washington and Moscow. (AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert) (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Feb. 9, 2016, file photo, Director of the National Intelligence James Clapper speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. The U.S. is accusing Russia of hacking political sites, saying it is trying to interfere with the upcoming presidential election. Intelligence officials say they are confident that the Russian government directed the recent breaches of emails from American people and institutions, including U.S. political organizations. The Office of the Director of National Intelligence and the Department of Homeland Security have released a joint statement saying that based on the "scope and sensitivity" of the hacking efforts, only Russia's "senior-most officials" could have authorized these activities. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

    FILE - In this Feb. 9, 2016, file photo, Director of the National Intelligence James Clapper speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. The U.S. is accusing Russia of hacking political sites, saying it is trying to interfere with the upcoming presidential ... election. Intelligence officials say they are confident that the Russian government directed the recent breaches of emails from American people and institutions, including U.S. political organizations. The Office of the Director of National Intelligence and the Department of Homeland Security have released a joint statement saying that based on the "scope and sensitivity" of the hacking efforts, only Russia's "senior-most officials" could have authorized these activities. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File) (The Associated Press)

  • In this Oct. 5, 2016, photo, Russian President Vladimir Putin listens during the opening session of the newly elected State Duma, Russia's lower house of parliament, in Moscow, Russia. The U.S. on Oct. 7 blamed the Russian government for the hacking of political sites and accused Moscow of trying to interfere with the upcoming presidential election. Pressure has been mounting on the Obama administration to call out Russia for the hacking of U.S. political sites and email accounts. The hacking claim Friday was another setback in already strained U.S.-Russia relations. (Alexei Nikolsky/Pool Photo via AP)

    In this Oct. 5, 2016, photo, Russian President Vladimir Putin listens during the opening session of the newly elected State Duma, Russia's lower house of parliament, in Moscow, Russia. The U.S. on Oct. 7 blamed the Russian government for the hacking ... of political sites and accused Moscow of trying to interfere with the upcoming presidential election. Pressure has been mounting on the Obama administration to call out Russia for the hacking of U.S. political sites and email accounts. The hacking claim Friday was another setback in already strained U.S.-Russia relations. (Alexei Nikolsky/Pool Photo via AP) (The Associated Press)

The U.S. is accusing Russia of hacking political sites, saying it is trying to interfere with the upcoming presidential election.

Continue Reading Below

Intelligence officials say they are confident that the Russian government directed the recent breaches of emails from American people and institutions, including U.S. political organizations.

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence and the Department of Homeland Security have released a joint statement saying that based on the "scope and sensitivity" of the hacking efforts, only Russia's "senior-most officials" could have authorized these activities.

Pressure has been mounting on the Obama administration to call out Russia on the hacking of political groups, including the Democratic National Committee.