MIT's flea market specializes in rare, obscure electronics

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  • In this Sept. 18, 2016, photo, Joel Goldberg, of Newton, Mass., browses MIT's Radio Society flea market on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass. Every third Sunday, MIT's Radio Society hosts a parking-lot flea market that's part yard sale and part curio museum from the world of electronics. Vendors come to hawk radio equipment, but also vintage Macintosh computers, castaway musical instruments, baubles of all kinds and the occasional space capsule. The storied market is part of a circuit of flea markets hosted by radio clubs across New England, but this one is known for attracting the strangest of wares. (AP Photo/Collin Binkley)

    In this Sept. 18, 2016, photo, Joel Goldberg, of Newton, Mass., browses MIT's Radio Society flea market on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass. Every third Sunday, MIT's Radio Society hosts a parking-lot flea ... market that's part yard sale and part curio museum from the world of electronics. Vendors come to hawk radio equipment, but also vintage Macintosh computers, castaway musical instruments, baubles of all kinds and the occasional space capsule. The storied market is part of a circuit of flea markets hosted by radio clubs across New England, but this one is known for attracting the strangest of wares. (AP Photo/Collin Binkley) (The Associated Press)

  • In this Sept. 18, 2016, photo, vendor Chuck Ochs shows a 1921 Crosley Model 51 radio, priced at $100, at MIT's Radio Society flea market on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass. Every third Sunday, MIT's Radio Society hosts a parking-lot flea market that's part yard sale and part curio museum from the world of electronics. Vendors come to hawk radio equipment, but also vintage Macintosh computers, castaway musical instruments, baubles of all kinds and the occasional space capsule. (AP Photo/Collin Binkley)

    In this Sept. 18, 2016, photo, vendor Chuck Ochs shows a 1921 Crosley Model 51 radio, priced at $100, at MIT's Radio Society flea market on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass. Every third Sunday, MIT's Radio ... Society hosts a parking-lot flea market that's part yard sale and part curio museum from the world of electronics. Vendors come to hawk radio equipment, but also vintage Macintosh computers, castaway musical instruments, baubles of all kinds and the occasional space capsule. (AP Photo/Collin Binkley) (The Associated Press)

  • In this Sept. 18, 2016, photo, a photo slide Magic Lantern projector, circa 1930, is displayed at MIT's Radio Society flea market on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass. Every third Sunday, MIT's Radio Society hosts a parking-lot flea market that's part yard sale and part curio museum from the world of electronics. Vendors come to hawk radio equipment, but also vintage Macintosh computers, castaway musical instruments, baubles of all kinds and the occasional space capsule. The storied market is part of a circuit of flea markets hosted by radio clubs across New England, but this one is known for attracting the strangest of wares. (AP Photo/Collin Binkley)

    In this Sept. 18, 2016, photo, a photo slide Magic Lantern projector, circa 1930, is displayed at MIT's Radio Society flea market on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass. Every third Sunday, MIT's Radio Society ... hosts a parking-lot flea market that's part yard sale and part curio museum from the world of electronics. Vendors come to hawk radio equipment, but also vintage Macintosh computers, castaway musical instruments, baubles of all kinds and the occasional space capsule. The storied market is part of a circuit of flea markets hosted by radio clubs across New England, but this one is known for attracting the strangest of wares. (AP Photo/Collin Binkley) (The Associated Press)

Once a month in the summer, a small parking lot on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's campus transforms into a high-tech flea market known for its outlandish offerings.

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The event is known as the Swapfest, a place where tech buffs from across New England go to buy and sell gadgets they can't find in stores. It was started 30 years ago as a fundraiser for MIT's student radio clubs and it still supports them. But now it also draws hundreds of visitors from all over.

Vendors come from afar to sell rare radio equipment, vintage computers and huge telescopes. One man sometimes hauls in a NASA space capsule he owns.

Organizers say it draws rare and obscure items because of its location, surrounded by MIT and high-tech labs around Boston.