• FILE - This is a  June 8, 1972 file photo of South Vietnamese forces follow after terrified children, including 9-year-old Kim Phuc, center, as they run down Route 1 near Trang Bang after an aerial napalm attack on suspected Viet Cong hiding places . Norway's Prime Minister Erna Solberg on Friday Sept. 9, 2016  challenged Facebook’s restrictions on nude photos by posting an iconic 1972 image of a naked girl running from an aerial napalm attack in Vietnam.  The Pulitzer Prize-winning image by Associated Press photographer Nick Ut is at the center of a heated debate about freedom of speech in Norway after Facebook deleted it from a Norwegian author’s page last month.  (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File)

    FILE - This is a June 8, 1972 file photo of South Vietnamese forces follow after terrified children, including 9-year-old Kim Phuc, center, as they run down Route 1 near Trang Bang after an aerial napalm attack on suspected Viet Cong hiding places . ... Norway's Prime Minister Erna Solberg on Friday Sept. 9, 2016 challenged Facebook’s restrictions on nude photos by posting an iconic 1972 image of a naked girl running from an aerial napalm attack in Vietnam. The Pulitzer Prize-winning image by Associated Press photographer Nick Ut is at the center of a heated debate about freedom of speech in Norway after Facebook deleted it from a Norwegian author’s page last month. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File) (The Associated Press)

  • The cover to Norway's largest circulation newspaper, Aftenposten, displayed in Oslo Friday Sept. 9, 2016. Editor-in-chief and CEO, Espen Egil Hansen, wrote an open letter to founder and CEO of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, accusing him of threatening the freedom of speech and abusing power after deleting the iconic picture from the Vietnam war, taken by Associated Press photographer  Nick Ut, of a young girl running from a napalm attack. The Pulitzer Prize-winning image by Nick Ut is at the center of a heated debate about freedom of speech in Norway after Facebook deleted it from a Norwegian author's page. (Cornelius Poppe, NTB scanpix via AP)

    The cover to Norway's largest circulation newspaper, Aftenposten, displayed in Oslo Friday Sept. 9, 2016. Editor-in-chief and CEO, Espen Egil Hansen, wrote an open letter to founder and CEO of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, accusing him of threatening ... the freedom of speech and abusing power after deleting the iconic picture from the Vietnam war, taken by Associated Press photographer Nick Ut, of a young girl running from a napalm attack. The Pulitzer Prize-winning image by Nick Ut is at the center of a heated debate about freedom of speech in Norway after Facebook deleted it from a Norwegian author's page. (Cornelius Poppe, NTB scanpix via AP) (The Associated Press)

Facebook apologizes for removing 'napalm girl' photo

Features Associated Press

Facebook's chief operating officer has apologized to Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg for deleting a photograph from its pages and conceded that "we don't always get it right."

Continue Reading Below

Sheryl Sandberg said in a letter to Solberg that she'd raised important issues about Facebook's decision to remove postings of an iconic 1972 image of a naked, screaming girl running from a napalm attack in Vietnam. On Friday, following protests in Norway the tech giant reversed its decision and allowed the photo "Terror of War" to be seen on its pages.

In a letter dated Oct. 10, Sandberg conceded that historical importance "sometimes ... outweighs the importance of keeping nudity off Facebook," after Solberg had reposted the 1972 image and other iconic photos with black boxes covering parts of the images.