Richard Fisher, president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, speaks during a conference before the Committee for the Republic Salon at the National Press Club in Washington January 16, 2013. U.S. authorities should break up the country's largest banks to protect against the risk of institutions that are "too big to fail" and that would saddle ordinary Americans with the cost of a bailout the next time they get into trouble, Fisher said on Wednesday. REUTERS/Jose Luis Magana (UNITED STATE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS HEADSHOT PROFILE) - RTR3CJKR

Richard Fisher, president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, speaks during a conference before the Committee for the Republic Salon at the National Press Club in Washington January 16, 2013. U.S. authorities should break up the country's ... largest banks to protect against the risk of institutions that are "too big to fail" and that would saddle ordinary Americans with the cost of a bailout the next time they get into trouble, Fisher said on Wednesday. REUTERS/Jose Luis Magana (UNITED STATE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS HEADSHOT PROFILE) - RTR3CJKR (Reuters)

PepsiCo Appoints Richard Fisher to Board

Business Leaders Dow Jones Newswires

PepsiCo Inc. on Monday appointed Richard W. Fisher to its board, just days after Mr. Fisher retired from his post as head of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.

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The appointment is effective immediately.

"Richard brings to our board a deep knowledge of financial matters and a breadth of global experience and expertise in international trade and regulatory matters," PepsiCo Chief Executive Indra Nooyi said in a news release.

Mr. Fisher retired as president and chief executive of the Dallas Fed on Thursday after holding the job for a decade.

Mr. Fisher spent much of his time at the Fed at odds with its policy choices. But he will be remembered as much for an extremely colorful speaking style that contrasted delightfully with the formal, jargony and sometimes turgid talk of many other central bankers.

From 1997 to 2001, he was a deputy U.S. trade representative.