• Shubham Banerjee, right, world on his Lego robotics braille printer as his dad Neil watches at home Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, in Santa Clara, Calif.  Banerjee launched a company to develop a low-cost machine to print Braille materials for the blind. It's based on a prototype he built with his Lego robotics kit for a school science fair project. Last month, tech giant Intel Corp. invested in his startup, Braigo Labs, making the 8th grader the youngest entrepreneur to receive venture capital funding. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

    Shubham Banerjee, right, world on his Lego robotics braille printer as his dad Neil watches at home Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, in Santa Clara, Calif. Banerjee launched a company to develop a low-cost machine to print Braille materials for the blind. It'... s based on a prototype he built with his Lego robotics kit for a school science fair project. Last month, tech giant Intel Corp. invested in his startup, Braigo Labs, making the 8th grader the youngest entrepreneur to receive venture capital funding. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez) (The Associated Press)

  • Shubham Banerjee  works on his lego robotics braille printer at home Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, in Santa Clara, Calif.  Banerjee launched a company to develop a low-cost machine to print Braille materials for the blind. It's based on a prototype he built with his Lego robotics kit for a school science fair project. Last month, tech giant Intel Corp. invested in his startup, Braigo Labs, making the 8th grader the youngest entrepreneur to receive venture capital funding. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

    Shubham Banerjee works on his lego robotics braille printer at home Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, in Santa Clara, Calif. Banerjee launched a company to develop a low-cost machine to print Braille materials for the blind. It's based on a prototype he built ... with his Lego robotics kit for a school science fair project. Last month, tech giant Intel Corp. invested in his startup, Braigo Labs, making the 8th grader the youngest entrepreneur to receive venture capital funding. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez) (The Associated Press)

  • Shubham Banerjee, right, works on his lego robotics braille printer as his dad Neil sets up a current computer version of the printer at home Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, in Santa Clara, Calif.  Banerjee launched a company to develop a low-cost machine to print Braille materials for the blind. It's based on a prototype he built with his Lego robotics kit for a school science fair project. Last month, tech giant Intel Corp. invested in his startup, Braigo Labs, making the 8th grader the youngest entrepreneur to receive venture capital funding. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

    Shubham Banerjee, right, works on his lego robotics braille printer as his dad Neil sets up a current computer version of the printer at home Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, in Santa Clara, Calif. Banerjee launched a company to develop a low-cost machine to ... print Braille materials for the blind. It's based on a prototype he built with his Lego robotics kit for a school science fair project. Last month, tech giant Intel Corp. invested in his startup, Braigo Labs, making the 8th grader the youngest entrepreneur to receive venture capital funding. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez) (The Associated Press)

California boy, 13, builds Braille printer with Lego kit, starts company with Intel funding

Career Associated Press

In Silicon Valley, it's never too early to become an entrepreneur. Just ask 13-year-old Shubham Banerjee.

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The California eighth-grader has launched a company to develop low-cost machines to print Braille, the touch-based writing system for the visually impaired.

Last year, Shubham built a Braille printer with a Lego robotics kit as a school science fair project after learning that current printers cost at least $2,000 — too expensive for most blind readers.

After his Lego-based printer won numerous awards and enthusiastic support from the blind community, Shubham started Braigo Labs this past summer with an initial $35,000 investment from his dad.

In November, tech giant Intel Corp. invested an undisclosed amount of venture capital in Shubham's startup, making him perhaps the youngest entrepreneur to receive such funding.