• FILE - This Wed., Dec. 17, 2014 photo shows a movie poster for the movie "The Interview" on display outside the AMC Glendora 12 movie theater, in Glendora, Calif. In an unprecedented move, Sony Pictures broadly released "The Interview" to digital platforms Wednesday, Dec. 24, 2014, a reversal of its previous plan not to show the film after hackers released thousands of documents online and threatened violence at theaters showing the comedy that depicts the assassination of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

    FILE - This Wed., Dec. 17, 2014 photo shows a movie poster for the movie "The Interview" on display outside the AMC Glendora 12 movie theater, in Glendora, Calif. In an unprecedented move, Sony Pictures broadly released "The Interview" to digital ... platforms Wednesday, Dec. 24, 2014, a reversal of its previous plan not to show the film after hackers released thousands of documents online and threatened violence at theaters showing the comedy that depicts the assassination of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File) (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Dec. 22, 2014, file photo, a South Korean army soldier walks near a TV screen showing an advertisement of Sony Picture's "The Interview," at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea.  It seems everyone has a theory about who really hacked Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc. Despite President Barack Obama’s conclusion that North Korea was the culprit, the Internet’s newest game of whodunit continues. Top theories include disgruntled Sony insiders, hired hackers, other foreign governments or Internet hooligans. Even some experts are undecided, with questions about why the communist state would steal and leak gigabytes of data, email threats to some Sony employees and their families then threaten moviegoers who planned to watch “The Interview” on Christmas. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)

    FILE - In this Dec. 22, 2014, file photo, a South Korean army soldier walks near a TV screen showing an advertisement of Sony Picture's "The Interview," at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea. It seems everyone has a theory about who ... really hacked Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc. Despite President Barack Obama’s conclusion that North Korea was the culprit, the Internet’s newest game of whodunit continues. Top theories include disgruntled Sony insiders, hired hackers, other foreign governments or Internet hooligans. Even some experts are undecided, with questions about why the communist state would steal and leak gigabytes of data, email threats to some Sony employees and their families then threaten moviegoers who planned to watch “The Interview” on Christmas. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File) (The Associated Press)

  • This photo released by Sony - Columbia Pictures shows James Franco, left, as Dave and Seth Rogen as Aaron in a scene from Columbia Pictures' "The Interview." (AP Photo/Sony - Columbia Pictures, Ed Araquel)

    This photo released by Sony - Columbia Pictures shows James Franco, left, as Dave and Seth Rogen as Aaron in a scene from Columbia Pictures' "The Interview." (AP Photo/Sony - Columbia Pictures, Ed Araquel) (The Associated Press)

Russia offers sympathy to North Korea over Sony hacking scandal

Features Associated Press

Russia has offered sympathy to North Korea amid the Sony hacking scandal, saying the movie that sparked the dispute was so scandalous that Pyongyang's anger was "quite understandable."

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Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman Alexander Lukashevich told Thursday's briefing that Washington failed to offer any proof to back its claims of Pyongyang's involvement in the hacking, adding the U.S. threats of retaliation were "counterproductive and dangerous."

The U.S. has blamed Pyongyang for the recent cyberattack on Sony Pictures, which produced "The Interview," a comedy depicting the assassination of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Pyongyang has denied a role in the hacking, but also praised it as a "righteous deed."

Sony initially decided not to release the film because of threats against U.S. cinemas, but released the movie online Wednesday.