WSJ.com What's News - Worldwide News Briefs for Oct 25

Features Dow Jones Newswires

CHINA EDGES CLOSER TO ONE-MAN RULE

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The future of 1.4 billion people, the world's second-largest economy and an emerging military juggernaut now lies largely in the hands of just one man: China's President Xi Jinping.

IRAQI KURDS OFFER CONCESSION AMID REFERENDUM BACKLASH

Iraqi Kurds offered to shelve their pursuit of statehood for now as pressure mounts on the leader of the country's semiautonomous region to step aside and the U.S. seeks to ease tension between two vital allies in the fight against Islamic State.

TILLERSON SEEKS CLOSER COOPERATION WITH INDIA

The U.S. and India agreed to work together more closely to bolster regional security and prevent other nations from providing safe spaces for terrorists, during a visit here by Secretary of State Rex Tillerson.

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KENYAN ELECTION RERUN TO GO AHEAD DESPITE EFFORT TO BLOCK IT

A controversial repeat-run election scheduled to take place in Kenya on Thursday is set to go ahead, after the Supreme Court failed to decide whether to block it, saying five justices didn't show up.

BRAZILIAN PRESIDENT EXPECTED TO BE RELEASED FROM HOSPITAL

Brazilian President Michel Temer was hospitalized Wednesday in the capital of Brasília and undergoing tests after feeling "discomfort" earlier in the day, a presidential spokesman said.

HOW FOREIGN WORKERS IN JAPAN ARE HELPING---AND HURTING---THE ECONOMY

For the first time in the postwar era, Japan has opened itself to a significant cohort of low-wage laborers from abroad, setting up a clash between Japan's short-and long-term goals: trying to raise wages to help spur spending and growth while expanding the workforce.

SOUTH SUDAN'S WORSENING CRISIS PROMPTS U.S. TO REASSESS AID

When U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley arrived in South Sudan on Wednesday to assess how U.S. aid is being spent, she walked into a humanitarian disaster that threatens U.S. security interests.

AIRLINES WARN U.S.-BOUND PASSENGERS OF ADDITIONAL SCREENING

Airlines are warnings U.S.-bound passengers they may be subject to interviews before boarding their flight as part of stepped up screening requirements Washington is demanding because of continued terrorism concerns.

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(END) Dow Jones Newswires

October 25, 2017 17:17 ET (21:17 GMT)