Are 'Snaplications' the Next Big Recruiting Trend?

Features Recruiter.com

When most job seekers think of using social media to apply for a new job, they think of networking websites like LinkedIn. But McDonald's recently pushed the boundaries of recruiting by partnering with Snapchat to hire new employees through what it calls "snaplications."

Continue Reading Below

McDonald's aimed to fill 250,000 summer jobs through Snapchat, mostly front-line customer service roles targeted at candidates in their teens and early 20s. It makes sense that McDonald's turned to Snapchat in this endeavor: The app has 166 million daily users, many of whom fall squarely in McDonald's target demographic.

The snaplications work like so: Job seekers can submit 10-second videos through Snapchat. The videos are essentially quick elevator pitches, answers to the "Tell me about yourself" question. After submitting videos, applicants are directed to a more traditional online application process.

It's tough to know exactly what to make of this unusual application process, though when you get down to it, it's not all that different from LinkedIn's one-click application feature. And, it must be said, these videos seem like a suitable way to make a good first impression. Research shows we have about seven seconds to make a good first impression; the snaplications give candidates 10 seconds.

Ultimately, these video-based applications don't seem all that different from the kinds of applications that came before them.

When I reached out to Snapchat to learn more, I found that the McDonald's campaign recently ended. However, another company may soon hire through Snapchat. McDonald's used existing Snapchat advertising technology to create the snaplications campaign, which means that same technology could be leveraged of by other companies seeking to recruit young talent.

Continue Reading Below

One lesson to take away from snaplications is this: You never know when or where you may find your next job opportunity. Do your best to represent yourself in a professional light, no matter what setting you're in – online or offline. Be ready to submit your application and your resume wherever you happen to be.

A version of this article originally appeared in the Memphis Daily News

Angela Copeland is a career coach and CEO at her firm, Copeland Coaching.