Sexist, vulgar posts on women's marches rebound on officials

Features Associated Press

  • In this Jan. 4, 2017 photo, Neb. state Sen. Bill Kintner of Papillion works on his laptop in the legislative Chamber on the first day of the 2017 legislative session, in Lincoln, Neb. Sen. Kintner could face expulsion from the Legislature for retweeting a talk show host's joke implying that Women's March demonstrators are too unattractive to sexually assault. Kintner's fellow lawmakers railed against him Tuesday in response to public outrage over his online posting, the latest in a long history of inflammatory statements. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

    In this Jan. 4, 2017 photo, Neb. state Sen. Bill Kintner of Papillion works on his laptop in the legislative Chamber on the first day of the 2017 legislative session, in Lincoln, Neb. Sen. Kintner could face expulsion from the Legislature for ... retweeting a talk show host's joke implying that Women's March demonstrators are too unattractive to sexually assault. Kintner's fellow lawmakers railed against him Tuesday in response to public outrage over his online posting, the latest in a long history of inflammatory statements. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik) (The Associated Press)

  • In this Jan. 4, 2017 photo, Neb. state Sen. Bill Kintner of Papillion works on his laptop in the legislative Chamber on the first day of the 2017 legislative session, in Lincoln, Neb. Sen. Kintner could face expulsion from the Legislature for retweeting a talk show host's joke implying that Women's March demonstrators are too unattractive to sexually assault. Kintner's fellow lawmakers railed against him Tuesday in response to public outrage over his online posting, the latest in a long history of inflammatory statements. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

    In this Jan. 4, 2017 photo, Neb. state Sen. Bill Kintner of Papillion works on his laptop in the legislative Chamber on the first day of the 2017 legislative session, in Lincoln, Neb. Sen. Kintner could face expulsion from the Legislature for ... retweeting a talk show host's joke implying that Women's March demonstrators are too unattractive to sexually assault. Kintner's fellow lawmakers railed against him Tuesday in response to public outrage over his online posting, the latest in a long history of inflammatory statements. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik) (The Associated Press)

  • In this Jan. 4, 2017 photo, Neb. state Sen. Bill Kintner of Papillion works on his laptop in the legislative Chamber on the first day of the 2017 legislative session, in Lincoln, Neb. Sen. Kintner could face expulsion from the Legislature for retweeting a talk show host's joke implying that Women's March demonstrators are too unattractive to sexually assault. Kintner's fellow lawmakers railed against him Tuesday in response to public outrage over his online posting, the latest in a long history of inflammatory statements. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

    In this Jan. 4, 2017 photo, Neb. state Sen. Bill Kintner of Papillion works on his laptop in the legislative Chamber on the first day of the 2017 legislative session, in Lincoln, Neb. Sen. Kintner could face expulsion from the Legislature for ... retweeting a talk show host's joke implying that Women's March demonstrators are too unattractive to sexually assault. Kintner's fellow lawmakers railed against him Tuesday in response to public outrage over his online posting, the latest in a long history of inflammatory statements. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik) (The Associated Press)

Some public officials across the U.S. are facing consequences for social media postings on recent women's marches seen as crossing the line of decency.

Continue Reading Below

The rash of incidents, which range from boorish to vulgar, highlight how nasty political discourse has become since the divisive presidential election.

Posts by two Indiana lawmakers deemed offensive led Republican statehouse leaders to offer social media tutorials.

A Park Ridge, Illinois, school board member resigned after using a derogative term for female anatomy to describe marchers.

President Donald Trump made twitter rants and opposition to "political correctness" a key to his appeal. But experts say most people, and even politicians, can't get away with similar antics.