Hays Recruitment Consultancy Section Manager Ignacio Ramos (L) interviews Vicente Balmaseda at the Hays offices in downtown Madrid December 5, 2008. Balmaseda, 36, lost his job as a conference stand designer six months ago. Tensions mounting between native job-seekers and immigrants competing for a declining pool of work in Spain will intensify in 2009 as generous benefits for those laid off reach the end of their fixed terms. Picture taken December 5, 2008. To match feature SPAIN-JOBLESS/ REUTERS/Susana Vera (SPAIN)

REUTERS/Susana Vera

How to Write a Job Description

Features NewsCore

Are you looking for perfect employees to fill vacancies in your organization? Need ideas to draw them in? A well-written job description is an important recruitment tool for any company. Job descriptions serve additional purposes beyond the hiring process. They are useful in clarifying responsibilities within the organization and can be used as legal documents in disputes relating to employment. They can also be referred to during performance evaluations. Here are some tips for writing a compelling job description:

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Figure out how you are going to place the job posting
Are you going to advertise through other outlets, or are you going to put your ad exclusively on your company website? This will affect your applicant pool. Monster.com suggests thinking like the job seeker you want to attract. Start by figuring out what search criteria would lead to your posting. Do you want to appeal to someone looking for a new job or someone who is currently unemployed? Unemployed individuals are more likely to use fewer search criteria.

Take care in choosing the job title
Try to select a job title that is simple and specific. Make sure the title makes sense to people who do not work at your office. Don’t use a question in place of a job title in Internet postings.

Include applicant requirements
Identify the required education level and employment experience. What type of background does an applicant need to be successful at the job? Are there specific skills that the applicant should display? Set realistic expectations. Be mindful of what you identify as mandatory requirements. You do not want to scare away a prospective applicant who may have other skills to offer.

Write a summary of what the job would entail
Don’t make it too lengthy; three or four sentences will suffice. Once you have a general summary, you can expand on it to include the responsibilities, duties and expectations that come with the position. Watch your word choice. Avoid gender bias language. Use terminology that the average person would understand. Form clear and concise sentences. Include an overview about your organization so applicants can get a feel for corporate culture. Present your company in a positive light, as job descriptions can be great marketing opportunities.

Give the applicant a clear idea of the logistics of the job
Applicants should know up front if they are applying for a full or part time job. You may want to include a salary range and tentative schedule to give the applicant an idea of what the hours would be like. Include the person or people to whom the applicant would report if they got the job. Give a location for the job even if there are positions available in multiple places or offices. Most importantly, let the applicant know who they should contact if they are interested.

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