• We Fund Dependency

      As I discuss in my syndicated column this week, the Welfare State perpetuates poverty.

      "There are no jobs!" That is what people told me outside a government "jobs center" in New York City.

      To check this out, I sent four researchers around the area. They quickly found 40 job openings. Twenty-four were entry-level positions. One restaurant owner told me he would hire 12 people if workers would just apply.

      It made me wonder what my government does in buildings called "job centers." So I asked a college intern, Zoelle Mallenbaum, to find out. Here's what she found:

      "First I went to the Manhattan Jobs Center and asked, "Can I get help finding a job?" They told me they don't do that. ‘We sign people up for food stamps.' I tried another jobs center. They told me to enroll for unemployment benefits."

      So the "jobs" centers help people get handouts. Neither center suggested people try the 40 job openings in the neighborhood.

      But some people, like my college intern, don't want the handout:

      "I wanted a job. I was told to go to ‘WorkForce1,' a New York City program... Finally, I met with an ‘adviser.' She told me I lacked experience. I know this. I asked for any job she thought I was qualified for, and she scheduled an interview at Pret, a food chain that trains employees. At Pret, I learned that my ‘interview' was just a weekly open house, publicized on the company's website. Anyone could walk in and apply. Workforce1 offered no advantage. Despite my ‘scheduled interview,' I waited 90 minutes before meeting a manager. He told me that WorkForce1 had ‘wasted my time, as they always do.' He said, ‘They never call, never ask questions.' He prefers to hire people who seek out jobs on their own, like those who see Pret ads on Craigslist.'"

      For more on how the government encourages dependency, the rest of my column here.

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      Syndicated Column
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