• Punch-Drunk Bully II

      For my next FBN show, Thursday, we’ll debate whether the new Republican congress critters will really cut the size of government.  The “old” Republicans clearly don’t have a good track record when it comes to spending.

      Holman Jenkin’s recent column reminds me that establishment Republicans are dangerous on many fronts. After President Obama first took office, he made a gesture toward bi-partisanship by making Republican Ray LaHood his Secretary of Transportation.  LaHood is very bad news.

      Any who wondered how much of a fresh start the administration would seek after its midterm humiliation will want to take note of Ray LaHood's continued presence as Transportation secretary.

      Mr. LaHood distinguished himself last year during the Toyota fiasco by publicly suggesting owners should stop driving their Toyotas, despite the absence of any evidence the cars were unsafe.

      He sat mutely during a congressional hearing while legislators and trial lawyers flogged an unsupported theory about electronic defects in Toyotas, never sharing his agency's ample wisdom on the real subject at hand.

      Of late, LaHood has been scaremongering about cell phone use in cars.

      He calls it a deadly "epidemic" on the highways, but once again he is spreading darkness as much as light. No less a harridan for safety than the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety has dubbed his campaign misguided. The group's own studies show that the numerous laws enacted around the country to ban or restrict cellphone use have produced no impact on accident rates. Even where phone use has measurably declined, crashes haven't.

      …The highway death rate has fallen to its lowest level since 1954, despite a doubling of population and quadrupling of vehicles on the road...

      And despite a million-fold increase in the use of smart-phones.

      TAGS
      Government
      Regulation
      Transportation
  • This Week's Show -- July 10, 2014

    MEDIA BIAS: When I began my career as a consumer reporter, I had an obvious agenda: Businesses cheat consumers! Government must regulate them! But when I wised up about the problems with government, my bosses resisted, and I stopped receiving Emmy Awards. Emmys reward liberal reporting.

    CENSORSHIP AT CBS: Investigative reporter Sharyl Attkisson has a similar story. She explains why she left CBS after it became "harder and harder to get stories on television" that criticized this government and "any powers that be."

    IS STOSSEL BIASED?: Years ago, journalist Howard Kurtz criticized me for not being objective. I said it's impossible for any journalist to be completely objective. Now that Howard Kurtz is on Fox, we debate again.

    THE OBJECTIVITY MYTH: Andrew Kirell of Mediaite.com says, "every journalist has a point of view and they don't just magically check it the minute they walk in the newsroom door."

    NEW MEDIA: Reason TV's Remy Munasifi uses music videos and parodies to complain about things like politicians' spending. One of his latest parodies highlights the scandal surrounding the VA hospitals. Munasifi discusses his videos, which have gone viral on YouTube.

    RETRO REPORT: It's great there's a new media organization called Retro Report, which reveals media hype of the past ("crack babies," America's landfill "crisis," the "superpredator," etc.) and corrects stories everyone in the media got wrong. I discuss the new show with its executive producer, Kyra Darnton.

    REAL OR FAKE?: Sometimes people in the media say things that are so bizarre, you'd think they were made up. Kennedy of The Independents quizzes FoxBusiness.com's Kate Rogers, Fox Business host Charles Payne and me to see if any of us can tell which quotes are real, and which were made up by my staff.

    MY TAKE: I used to report on lots of scares. CBS even ran an ad for me where someone called me a "guardian angel."

    That's bunk. The only guardian angel is a free and open society. That's what allows innovation, gives people longer lives, and lifts billions out of poverty. But these gradual improvements aren't newsworthy. Scares and disaster make the news.

    News is broken not just because we're biased but because most good and important news happens slowly.

    9PM ET on Fox Business Network