• This Week’s Show and Column: Entrepreneurs Under Attack

      Everyone says he likes small business.  Even big-government types.  Then they find all kinds of reasons to make business owners jump through hoops for the right to operate.

      On my show Thursday, and column this week, I cover several  examples:

      Case No. 1. The monks at St. Joseph Abbey had to take the state of Louisiana to federal court to defend their right to make money selling handmade caskets. That's right: empty wooden boxes. But as soon as the monks started selling them, they were shocked to receive a cease-and-desist order from something called the Louisiana State Board of Funeral Directors. The funeral directors had managed to get their state to pass a law decreeing that only "licensed funeral directors" may sell "funeral merchandise" like caskets. To sell caskets legally, the monks would have to obtain a funeral director's license. That required a year-long apprenticeship, passing a funeral industry test and converting their monastery into a "funeral establishment" by installing embalming equipment, among other things.

      The state board and the Louisiana Funeral Directors Association — the profession's lobbyist — say the law is designed to protect consumers. But that's what established businesses always say about absurd regulations they demand. An unusually candid funeral director told The Wall Street Journal, "They're cutting into our profit." Well, yes, free competition does do that. That's the point.

      Another funeral director said that the law must remain unchanged because casket-making is a complicated business: "A quarter of America is oversized. I don't even know if the monks know how to make an oversized casket." Does that even deserve a comment?

      The full column, with more examples, here.

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      Crony Capitalism
      Economics
      Entrepreneurs
      Government