Well, don't look now but maybe the economy isn't it for Mitt - the good news on jobs that could just save the president's job.

Companies are hiring. People are spending. Tonight, the Wall Street honcho saying, "Add it all up - all of these Republican guys are going down" and now, they're sticking it to Rick. Santorum slammed, not for his spending record in the senate, but for his making money after leaving the senate.

Then, the Volt is a dolt. I watch car commercials. It looks stupid. When I warned you the Chevy Volt would not catch fire with car buyers, I forgot to warn you, well, they could catch fire. Now GM is recalling their costly dolt of a Volt as more are calling to make sure it doesn't burn another dime of taxpayer cash.

We're kicking the tires and lighting the fire now.

Well, forget about Republicans battling it out in "the granite state," are the economic numbers now good enough to etch the president's re-election in stone?

Welcome, everybody. I'm Neil Cavuto.

And the scene right now in Manchester, New Hampshire. Man, oh, man, that city and state getting a lot of attention where Republicans are pushing an economy that they say is going down, but even in the face of data that shows things are looking up, not up a lot but just up, and jobless claims still high but not nearly as high - 372,000 in the latest week, a darn near consistent trend now recently every week. And on the private sector front, even better. ADP reporting 325,000 more such jobs last month and maybe a good precursor to the big jobs number out tomorrow for the same month? Another nonmanufacturing piece of data could offer a clue. The latest Institute of Supply Management stat far, far from flat, and 52.6 percent stronger than expected continue a trend that's gone on a lot longer than expected.

Now, none of this means the economy is going gangbusters but collectively, the data could be helping the White House's argument, "You know what, it's no longer bust" which could be a big bust for Republicans storming the snows of New Hampshire, trudging on in the economy that might, might, might, might be picking up.