Seattle to cut ties with Wells Fargo over oil pipeline

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  • Seattle City Council member Debora Juarez, right, is embraced by Rachel Heaton, a Muckleshoot tribal member, as Council member Kshama Sawant stands nearby after Heaton gave both women gifts from the Native American community before a Council meeting Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017, in Seattle. The City Council is scheduled to vote on whether to divest $3 billion in city funds from Wells Fargo over its funding of the Dakota Access Pipeline. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

    Seattle City Council member Debora Juarez, right, is embraced by Rachel Heaton, a Muckleshoot tribal member, as Council member Kshama Sawant stands nearby after Heaton gave both women gifts from the Native American community before a Council meeting ... Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017, in Seattle. The City Council is scheduled to vote on whether to divest $3 billion in city funds from Wells Fargo over its funding of the Dakota Access Pipeline. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson) (The Associated Press)

  • Paul Cheoketen, of the Wagner Saanich First Nations tribe, raises his arms as he ends his comments in favor of divestiture before a Seattle City Council meeting Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017, in Seattle. The City Council is scheduled to vote on whether to divest $3 billion in city funds from Wells Fargo over its funding of the Dakota Access Pipeline. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

    Paul Cheoketen, of the Wagner Saanich First Nations tribe, raises his arms as he ends his comments in favor of divestiture before a Seattle City Council meeting Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017, in Seattle. The City Council is scheduled to vote on whether to ... divest $3 billion in city funds from Wells Fargo over its funding of the Dakota Access Pipeline. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson) (The Associated Press)

  • Cynthia Lynet holds a sign in favor of divestiture during a Seattle City Council meeting before a scheduled vote on whether to divest $3 billion in city funds from Wells Fargo over its funding of the Dakota Access Pipeline, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017, in Seattle. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

    Cynthia Lynet holds a sign in favor of divestiture during a Seattle City Council meeting before a scheduled vote on whether to divest $3 billion in city funds from Wells Fargo over its funding of the Dakota Access Pipeline, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017, in ... Seattle. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson) (The Associated Press)

The Seattle City Council has voted to cut ties with banking giant Wells Fargo over its role as a lender to the Dakota Access pipeline project as well as other business practices.

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Cheers erupted from the crowd when the measure passed on a unanimous vote Tuesday directing the city to end its contract with the San Francisco-based bank. The measure also requires that a company's business practices be considered in city contracts.

Supporters who spoke said they hoped Seattle's action will inspire other cities to do the same.

Tribal members, including from the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, urged the council to send a broader message to oppose the pipeline and stand with indigenous people.

Wells Fargo spokesman David Kennedy says the bank is disappointed in the city's decision.

Wells Fargo manages more than $3 billion of Seattle's operating account.