Bills aim to beef up oil transportation safety

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  • FILE - In this July 27, 2015, file photo, traffic passes one of two mile-long oil trains parked near the King County Airport in Seattle. More crude oil than ever is expected to move through Washington state, particularly since the Canadian government approved the Kinder Morgan pipeline project that will triple the number of tankers and barges plying local waters. Washington already has some of the toughest oil spill prevention and preparedness rules in the country but lawmakers say there are big gaps and that the rules need to be strengthened to keep up with the changing landscape. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)

    FILE - In this July 27, 2015, file photo, traffic passes one of two mile-long oil trains parked near the King County Airport in Seattle. More crude oil than ever is expected to move through Washington state, particularly since the Canadian government ... approved the Kinder Morgan pipeline project that will triple the number of tankers and barges plying local waters. Washington already has some of the toughest oil spill prevention and preparedness rules in the country but lawmakers say there are big gaps and that the rules need to be strengthened to keep up with the changing landscape. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File) (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Sept. 2, 2014, file photo, a northbound oil train sits idled on tracks, stopped by protesters blocking the track ahead, in Everett, Wash. More crude oil than ever is expected to move through Washington state, particularly since the Canadian government approved the Kinder Morgan pipeline project that will triple the number of tankers and barges plying local waters. Washington already has some of the toughest oil spill prevention and preparedness rules in the country but lawmakers say there are big gaps and that the rules need to be strengthened to keep up with the changing landscape. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)

    FILE - In this Sept. 2, 2014, file photo, a northbound oil train sits idled on tracks, stopped by protesters blocking the track ahead, in Everett, Wash. More crude oil than ever is expected to move through Washington state, particularly since the ... Canadian government approved the Kinder Morgan pipeline project that will triple the number of tankers and barges plying local waters. Washington already has some of the toughest oil spill prevention and preparedness rules in the country but lawmakers say there are big gaps and that the rules need to be strengthened to keep up with the changing landscape. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File) (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this July 27, 2015, file photo, cars from one of two mile-long oil trains parked near the King County Airport are seen in Seattle. More crude oil than ever is expected to move through Washington state, particularly since the Canadian government approved the Kinder Morgan pipeline project that will triple the number of tankers and barges plying local waters. Washington already has some of the toughest oil spill prevention and preparedness rules in the country but lawmakers say there are big gaps and that the rules need to be strengthened to keep up with the changing landscape. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)

    FILE - In this July 27, 2015, file photo, cars from one of two mile-long oil trains parked near the King County Airport are seen in Seattle. More crude oil than ever is expected to move through Washington state, particularly since the Canadian ... government approved the Kinder Morgan pipeline project that will triple the number of tankers and barges plying local waters. Washington already has some of the toughest oil spill prevention and preparedness rules in the country but lawmakers say there are big gaps and that the rules need to be strengthened to keep up with the changing landscape. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File) (The Associated Press)

With more crude oil expected to move through Washington state, Democratic lawmakers want to toughen rules around oil transportation and raise more money for spill prevention and response efforts.

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Companion bills in the House and Senate aim to reduce the risk of oil spills with provisions that target oil carried by vessels, pipelines and trains.

Supporters say the legislation is needed to address the growing risks of oil shipped through state waters.

In November, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau approved Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project, which will increase from five to 34 the monthly number of oil tankers and barges plying the shared waters of Washington state and Canada.

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