Exiting rail safety chief looks to technology to save lives

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  • FILE – In this June 2, 2015, file photo, then-acting Federal Railroad Administrator Sarah Feinberg speaks with reporters after testifying about the May 2015 derailment of an Amtrak train in Philadelphia, as part of a House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee oversight hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Feinberg leaves office Friday, Jan. 20, 2017, after a two-year tenure as the nation's chief railroad regulator, championing safety and technology initiatives that remain a work in progress. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)

    FILE – In this June 2, 2015, file photo, then-acting Federal Railroad Administrator Sarah Feinberg speaks with reporters after testifying about the May 2015 derailment of an Amtrak train in Philadelphia, as part of a House Transportation and ... Infrastructure Committee oversight hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Feinberg leaves office Friday, Jan. 20, 2017, after a two-year tenure as the nation's chief railroad regulator, championing safety and technology initiatives that remain a work in progress. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File) (The Associated Press)

  • FILE – In this Feb. 4, 2015, file photo, a man wearing a Federal Railroad Administration vest looks over wreckage of a Metro-North Railroad train and an SUV, following a collision that killed five train passengers and the SUV's driver about 20 miles north of New York City in Valhalla, N.Y. Federal Railroad Administrator Sarah Feinberg leaves office Friday, Jan. 20, 2017, after a two-year tenure as the nation's chief railroad regulator, championing safety and technology initiatives that remain a work in progress. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

    FILE – In this Feb. 4, 2015, file photo, a man wearing a Federal Railroad Administration vest looks over wreckage of a Metro-North Railroad train and an SUV, following a collision that killed five train passengers and the SUV's driver about 20 miles ... north of New York City in Valhalla, N.Y. Federal Railroad Administrator Sarah Feinberg leaves office Friday, Jan. 20, 2017, after a two-year tenure as the nation's chief railroad regulator, championing safety and technology initiatives that remain a work in progress. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File) (The Associated Press)

  • FILE – In this May 12, 2015, file photo, emergency personnel work near the wreckage of a New York City-bound Amtrak train following a derailment that killed eight people in Philadelphia. Federal Railroad Administrator Sarah Feinberg leaves office Friday, Jan. 20, 2017, after a two-year tenure as the nation's chief railroad regulator, championing safety and technology initiatives that remain a work in progress. (AP Photo/Joseph Kaczmarek, File)

    FILE – In this May 12, 2015, file photo, emergency personnel work near the wreckage of a New York City-bound Amtrak train following a derailment that killed eight people in Philadelphia. Federal Railroad Administrator Sarah Feinberg leaves office ... Friday, Jan. 20, 2017, after a two-year tenure as the nation's chief railroad regulator, championing safety and technology initiatives that remain a work in progress. (AP Photo/Joseph Kaczmarek, File) (The Associated Press)

The nation's chief railroad regulator is using technology to make rail crossings safer as she prepares to leave office.

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Sarah Feinberg says technology companies are beginning to add crossing warnings to their GPS devices and mapping applications.

Feinberg has spent her two years in office pressing the railroad industry to hasten the installation of automatic speed controls and recently urged railroads to test engineers for sleep apnea.

She had been on the job for just three weeks when a packed commuter train slammed into an SUV stopped on tracks north of New York City, killing six people.

The February 2015 crash highlighted a problem that has plagued the railroad industry since the invention of the automobile: the potential for danger wherever tracks and roads meet.

Her tenure ends Friday.