The Latest: Vermont governor 'outraged' over utility malware

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The Latest on a malware code found on a Vermont electric utility's laptop (all times local):

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11:30 p.m.

Vermont's governor says he has been in touch with the federal government and the state's utilities about the discovery on a utility laptop of a malware code used by Russian hackers.

Democratic Gov. Peter Shumlin says people should be "alarmed and outraged" Russian President Vladimir Putin "has been attempting to hack our electric grid."

The Burlington Electric Department says it detected the malware in a laptop not connected to its grid systems. It says it took "immediate action to isolate the laptop and alerted federal officials."

The governor says the episode should highlight the urgent need for the federal government to "put an end" to "Russian meddling."

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Colchester-based utility Green Mountain Power said Friday a complete check of its systems has found "no security concerns."

Russia also has been accused of interfering in the U.S. presidential election. It has denied hacking U.S. systems.

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10:50 p.m.

A Vermont electric utility has confirmed it found on one of its laptops a malware code the U.S. government says is used by Russian hackers.

The Burlington Electric Department says U.S. utilities were alerted by the Department of Homeland Security of a malware code used in Grizzly Steppe, the name Homeland Security has applied to a Russian campaign linked to recent hacks.

Burlington Electric says it detected the malware in a laptop not connected to its grid systems. It says it took "immediate action to isolate the laptop and alerted federal officials."

The utility says its team is working with federal officials to trace the malware and prevent other attempts to infiltrate utility systems.

Colchester-based electric company Green Mountain Power says its systems are secure. It said Friday a complete systems check found "no security concerns."

Russia has denied hacking U.S. systems.

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10:05 p.m.

Vermont electric company Green Mountain Power says it was not the utility that reported a possible Russian hack into its systems and its systems are secure.

A Washington Post story based on anonymous U.S. officials says a code associated with a Russian hacking operation was detected within the system of a Vermont utility but wasn't actively used to disrupt operations. It says the breach "represents a potentially serious vulnerability." It says it's unclear which utility reported the breach but there are only two major utilities in the state: Green Mountain Power and Burlington Electric.

Colchester-based Green Mountain Power said Friday it "did not self-report a security incident." It says a complete systems check has found "no security concerns."

The Burlington Electric Department hasn't responded to email and phone messages seeking comment.

Russia has denied hacking U.S. systems.