The Latest: Utah attorney general to sue over monument

Markets Associated Press

  • FILE - This April 5, 2012 file photo shows rock formations in Gold Butte, located about 90 miles northeast of Las Vegas. President Barack Obama designated two national monuments Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2016, at sites in Utah and Nevada that have become key flashpoints over use of public land in the U.S. West, marking the administration’s latest move to protect environmentally sensitive areas in its final days. In Nevada, a 300,000-acre Gold Butte National Monument outside Las Vegas would protect the scenic and ecologically fragile area near where rancher Cliven Bundy led in an armed standoff with government agents in 2014. It includes rock art, artifacts, rare fossils and recently discovered tracks. (Jeff Scheid  /Las Vegas Review-Journal via AP, File)

    FILE - This April 5, 2012 file photo shows rock formations in Gold Butte, located about 90 miles northeast of Las Vegas. President Barack Obama designated two national monuments Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2016, at sites in Utah and Nevada that have become ... key flashpoints over use of public land in the U.S. West, marking the administration’s latest move to protect environmentally sensitive areas in its final days. In Nevada, a 300,000-acre Gold Butte National Monument outside Las Vegas would protect the scenic and ecologically fragile area near where rancher Cliven Bundy led in an armed standoff with government agents in 2014. It includes rock art, artifacts, rare fossils and recently discovered tracks. (Jeff Scheid /Las Vegas Review-Journal via AP, File) (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this July 14, 2016, file photo, protesters hold their signs after U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell arrived for a meeting with San Juan County Commissioners in Monticello, Utah. President Barack Obama designated two national monuments Wednesday, Dec. 28, at sites in Utah and Nevada that have become key flashpoints over use of public land in the U.S. West. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

    FILE - In this July 14, 2016, file photo, protesters hold their signs after U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell arrived for a meeting with San Juan County Commissioners in Monticello, Utah. President Barack Obama designated two national monuments ... Wednesday, Dec. 28, at sites in Utah and Nevada that have become key flashpoints over use of public land in the U.S. West. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File) (The Associated Press)

The Latest on new national monuments in Utah and Nevada (all times local):

Continue Reading Below

4:40 p.m.

The Republican attorney general of Utah says he's going to sue over President Barack Obama's designation of the Bears Ears National Monument that spans 1.35 million acres in the state.

Attorney General Sean Reyes said in a statement Wednesday that he's working with local officials to file a lawsuit. He said Utah also will look to work with President-elect Donald Trump to try to curtail the monument.

It comes after the White House announced the protection of land considered sacred to Native American tribes and home to archaeological sites, including ancient cliff dwellings.

It's a victory for tribes and conservationists who pushed for the Bears Ears area to be folded into a monument.

Continue Reading Below

Critics called it another layer of unnecessary federal control that they feared would close the area to development and recreation.

___

3:10 p.m.

President Barack Obama has designated two new national monuments in Utah and Nevada at sites that have become key flashpoints over public land in the U.S. West.

The announcement Wednesday marks the administration's latest move to protect environmentally sensitive areas in its final days.

The White House says Bears Ears National Monument in Utah will cover 1.35 million acres of tribal land in the Four Corners region. A coalition of tribes pushed to ensure protections for lands that are home to an estimated 100,000 archaeological sites, including ancient cliff dwellings.

Critics called it another layer of unnecessary federal control that would close the area to development and recreation.

The 300,000-acre Gold Butte National Monument outside Las Vegas also was named. It's an ecologically fragile area near where Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy led an armed standoff with government agents in 2014.