Senator: Exploding e-cigarette recalls need to be considered

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  • FILE - In this Nov. 29, 2016, file photo, Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks to the media on Capitol Hill in Washington. Schumer is increasing the heat on the federal government to consider recalling e-cigarette batteries and devices that explode and catch fire, injuring users. The New York Democrat calls e-cigarettes "ticking time bombs." (AP Photo/Molly Riley, File)

    FILE - In this Nov. 29, 2016, file photo, Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks to the media on Capitol Hill in Washington. Schumer is increasing the heat on the federal government to consider recalling e-cigarette batteries and devices that explode ... and catch fire, injuring users. The New York Democrat calls e-cigarettes "ticking time bombs." (AP Photo/Molly Riley, File) (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this April 23, 2014 file photo, E-cigarettes appear on display at Vape store in Chicago. U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer is increasing the heat on the federal government to consider recalling e-cigarette batteries and devices that explode and catch fire, injuring users. The New York Democrat calls e-cigarettes "ticking time bombs." (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File)

    FILE - In this April 23, 2014 file photo, E-cigarettes appear on display at Vape store in Chicago. U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer is increasing the heat on the federal government to consider recalling e-cigarette batteries and devices that explode and ... catch fire, injuring users. The New York Democrat calls e-cigarettes "ticking time bombs." (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File) (The Associated Press)

U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer is increasing the heat on the federal government to consider recalling e-cigarette batteries and devices that explode and catch fire, injuring users.

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The New York Democrat calls e-cigarettes "ticking time bombs." He says the volatile e-cigs continue to cause injuries including severe burns.

Faulty lithium-ion batteries are seen as the likely culprits.

Schumer wants the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to figure out why so many devices from China and elsewhere are exploding. He says recent injuries are proof federal action is urgently needed.

Schumer on Sunday cited a recent Associated Press story saying the FDA identified about 66 explosions in 2015 and early 2016. The AP story said the numbers kept by the FDA may be an undercount.

The industry maintains e-cigarettes are safe when used properly.

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The FDA says it's reviewing e-cigarettes.