Tough-on-corruption NY prosecutor tells Trump he will stay

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  • United States Attorney General for the Southern District of New York Preet Bharara speaks with reporters at Trump Tower, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

    United States Attorney General for the Southern District of New York Preet Bharara speaks with reporters at Trump Tower, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) (The Associated Press)

  • United States Attorney General for the Southern District of New York Preet Bharara speaks with reporters at Trump Tower, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

    United States Attorney General for the Southern District of New York Preet Bharara speaks with reporters at Trump Tower, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) (The Associated Press)

  • United States Attorney General for the Southern District of New York Preet Bharara speaks with reporters at Trump Tower, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

    United States Attorney General for the Southern District of New York Preet Bharara speaks with reporters at Trump Tower, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) (The Associated Press)

Financial cheaters and corrupt politicians beware: One of America's hardest-charging prosecutors isn't going anywhere.

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Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara (buh-RAH'-ruh) says he will stay on in the Donald Trump administration, signaling in at least one way that the president-elect may be serious about keeping his campaign promise to crack down on corruption.

Trump invited Bharara to keep his high-profile post and he didn't hesitate. Bharara emerged from a midday meeting at Trump Tower on Wednesday to say he would be continuing a job he's held for seven years.

Bharara initially became known as a Wall Street enforcer for winning convictions against dozens of defendants in insider-trading cases. More recently, he's built his reputation on fighting public corruption, which included the convictions of two of New York's most powerful politicians.