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Dead vegetation reported but officials say no evidence of contamination in bay after ND spill

  • North Dakota Saltwater Spill-1.jpg

    Saltwater leaks into this stream after running downhill, Thursday, July 10, 2014, near Mandaree, N.D. A pipeline leak on Fort Berthold Indian Reservation spilled 1 million gallons of saltwater, a byproduct of oil and gas production. Company officials say the leak likely started over the Fourth of July weekend. (AP Photo/Tyler Bell) (The Associated Press)

  • North Dakota Saltwater Spill-2.jpg

    In this July 10, 2014, photo, pelicans pass a containment boom on the edge of Bear Den Bay, close to the location of a saltwater pipeline spill near Mandaree, N.D. (AP Photo/Tyler Bell) (The Associated Press)

  • North Dakota Saltwater Spill-3.jpg

    Environmental workers take samples to assess level of contamination, and surveyors measure size of affected area at the site of saltwater spill Thursday, July 10, 2014, near Mandaree, N.D. A pipeline leak on Fort Berthold Indian Reservation spilled 1 million gallons of saltwater, a byproduct of oil and gas production. Company officials say the leak likely started over the Fourth of July weekend. (AP Photo/Tyler Bell) (The Associated Press)

  • North Dakota Saltwater Spill-4.jpg

    Construction crews shores up dams with sandbags at the site of saltwater spill Thursday, July 10, 2014, near Mandaree, N.D. A pipeline leak on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation spilled about 1 million gallons of saltwater, a byproduct of oil and gas production. Company officials say the leak likely started over the Fourth of July weekend. (AP Photo/Tyler Bell) (The Associated Press)

  • North Dakota Saltwater Spill-5.jpg

    A worker builds up the berm between the saltwater spill area with dead vegetation, and the seemingly unaffected land, Thursday, July 10, 2014, near Mandaree, N.D. A pipeline leak on Fort Berthold Indian Reservation spilled 1 million gallons of saltwater, a byproduct of oil and gas production. Company officials say the leak likely started over the Fourth of July weekend. (AP Photo/Tyler Bell) (The Associated Press)

A company official says the path of saltwater that spilled from a pipeline in western North Dakota extends for nearly 2 miles and has left behind a 200-yard-long stretch of dead vegetation.

But Miranda Jones, vice president of environmental safety and regulatory at Crestwood Midstream Partners LP, says there is no evidence yet that the spill has contaminated nearby Bear Den Bay. Crestwood subsidiary Arrow Pipeline LLC owns the pipeline.

The Environmental Protection Agency also says it has no confirmed reports that the saltwater, a byproduct of oil and gas production, has reached the bay.

The bay leads to Lake Sakakawea, a drinking water source for the Fort Berthold Indian reservation.

On a boat trip Thursday, The Associated Press saw no visible signs of contamination in the bay.