It's ironic that Steve Jobs supported President Obama -- because Apple's (AAPL) success is one of the best arguments against Obama's attempts to use the government to revive the economy. 

Throughout the economic trials and tribulations of the past four years, Apple has continued to produce, improvise, hire and grow -- without any help from the government.

Apple didn't need a bailout, because Apple customers never stopped buying. We keep hearing that the economy's bad now because consumers aren't spending. But that is baloney. They spent at Apple. Apple shows that a good company with a spectacular product will create its own demand, no matter how bad the economy. 

Apple customers ignored the awful economic news by constantly digging deeper into their wallets to go out and buy the next, best Apple product.

Of course, it wasn't just the products that kept the customers coming in through bad economic times.

From design, to sales, to customer support, Apple's business model was as close to perfection as any company could ever get. But the most important point here -- the point that contradicts  everything the brainiacs and the people in government have been telling you -- is that this recession is not about consumers; it's about producers.

We're not in trouble because people aren't consuming. We're in trouble because producers aren't producing. Obviously there aren't many Steve Jobs out there.

But there are other examples of companies that grew through the recession, companies like Whole Foods.

Government bureaucrats can't create an economic recovery by trying to create demand for products that consumers don't want, like electric cars

Only bold, independent entrepreneurs, with the elbow room to live out their dreams, can do that. That's the message of Steve Jobs and Apple. His dreams, his faith, was stronger than the recession.

Faith can move mountains -- as long as the bureaucrats and the politicians get out of the way.

David Asman joined FOX News Channel (FNC) in 1997 and currently serves as host of "Forbes on FOX," a weekend half-hour program that offers an informative look at the business week (Saturday from 11:00-11:30 AM/ET). Asman is also an anchor on FOX Business Network, where he co-hosts "After the Bell" (4-5 PM/ET) with anchor Liz Claman. Click here for more information on David Asman