Ford (F) plans to mark the 50th anniversary of the Mustang by parking one on the top of the Empire State Building, recreating a stunt the company used to help launch the first version of the pony car.

The nation’s second-largest automaker unveiled a redesigned version of the Mustang in December. Ford expects the new 2015 model to hit showrooms sometime in the fall.

On Tuesday, Ford said a 2015 Mustang convertible will be displayed on the observation deck of the Empire State Building in New York from April 16-17, just before the start of the New York International Auto Show.

“New York is one of the greatest cities in the world, and it’s the place where the Ford Mustang story began 50 years ago,” said Ford chief operating officer Mark Fields. “We’re thrilled to be visiting the architectural landmark that has been the heart of the Manhattan skyline for 83 years with the newest generation of the car that is the soul of Ford Motor Company.”

How does Ford plan to get a Mustang to the 86th floor? The company said no portable crane can reach the observatory, and the building’s spire eliminates delivery by helicopter.

Technicians are hoping the car can make it the same way it did nearly 50 years ago -- piece by piece. A team is currently disassembling a Mustang into sections so it can fit into the elevators.

Ford introduced the Mustang on April 17, 1964, at the World’s Fair in New York. A prototype convertible was brought to the Empire State Building a year later. It was cut into three main sections, plus the windshield, in order to be transported by the elevators.

But the latest version of the Mustang is nearly seven inches longer and four inches wider than the original. Technicians used computer engineering data to find the right places to slice up the convertible, and they’ll have less than six hours to reassemble the sections.

“Like all good craftsmen, our team is measuring twice and cutting once to make sure we can get this Mustang up in the elevators,” said Dave Pericak, Mustang chief engineer.

Ford shares, which are down 10.8% over the last six months, slipped seven cents to $15.32 in recent trading.

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