Two top Equifax executives to retire

Industries Dow Jones Newswires

Equifax executive stock sales must be investigated: Sen. Kennedy

Sen. John Kennedy, (R-La.), on starting an investigation into the Equifax executive stock sales.

Equifax Inc., grappling with the fallout from its massive data breach, announced Friday evening the retirement of its chief information officer and chief security officer.

Continue Reading Below


Equifax said David Webb, its chief information officer, is being replaced by Mark Rohrwasser, who joined Equifax in 2016 and has led Equifax International IT operations since that time.


Susan Mauldin, the company's chief security officer, is being replaced by Russ Ayres, who has been appointed to that position on an interim basis. Mr. Ayres most recently served as vice president of IT at Equifax. Mr. Ayres will report directly to the CIO.

More on this...


The company said the personnel changes were "effective immediately."


The move comes in the wake of the breach that compromised vital personal information of potentially 143 million Americans, including dates of birth and social security numbers. The company said its internal investigation of the breach is ongoing and that it continues to work closely with the Federal Bureau of Investigations.


The breach has shaken the trust of the public and lenders in the ability of one of the largest credit-reporting companies to safely store and manage consumers' data.

Continue Reading Below


In addition, Equifax, in a progress update about the hack, confirmed on Friday that it had hired Mandiant, the cyber investigations division of FireEye Inc., which was previously reported by The Wall Street Journal. The company also further specified when the intrusion into its systems took place, saying it believed it happened between May 13 and July 30.