Resell Your Google Pixel, Get Locked Out of Your Account?

By Features PCmag

Considering a little side gig reselling Pixel handsets for a small profit? It might be easy work, but if you care at all about being able to access your Google Account, we'd advise against it.

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Word has it that Google has disabled the accounts of more than 200 people for reselling Pixels. DansDeals.com reports that these individuals all bought Pixel phones and had them shipped directly to a dealer in New Hampshire, who paid them a profit on each device.

"There is no sales tax in New Hampshire and the phones are then resold to others," the report notes.

The only issue with this plan: Google doesn't allow it. The company's terms of service states that people may only purchase devices for personal use or to give as a gift. Google prohibits people from commercially reselling any device.

Apparently the dealer "feels awful" about the whole thing. That doesn't really help the more than 200 people who are now locked out of their accounts, and can't access their Gmail, Google Drive, or any other Google services.

"Google has apparently closed the accounts of everyone who shipped their phones directly to his address in New Hampshire, regardless of how many phones the account ordered or whether the phones actually shipped or were cancelled by Google," the report notes.

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Google has sent messages to those people's recovery emails stating that all their account data will be deleted if they don't successfully appeal the suspension. Some of the people reportedly used several different accounts to place orders for phones, however, so they're locked out of all of them.

On a positive note, the dealer in question is reportedly "more than happy to return all the phones to Google if it will rectify the situation." Apparently, this person has been doing the same thing since Google launched the original Nexus, and has never had a problem before now.

We've reached out to Google about the situation, but have yet to hear back.

This article originally appeared on PCMag.com.