The 3 Basic Tenets of Interview Prep

Features Recruiter.com

Even though it may not seem like it at times, getting your resume seen and receiving a call from a recruiter is the easy part of job searching. The challenge really begins when it comes time to interview.

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Because ResumeSpice was built by recruiters, we know how to ace the interview – and we want you to know, too. Here are the three basic tenets of interview prep:

1. Know the Job Description

The great thing about a job description is that it leaves very little guesswork about what the employer wants and expects. You can use this to your advantage during an interview. For example, if a job description for a recruiting position states that "agency experience is desirable but not required," you know it's a good idea to talk up your experience with agencies during the interview.

Consider printing the job description and making notes on it to bring to the interview. Set cues for yourself around how you want to talk about your experience as it pertains to certain requirements of the job.

2. Do Your Research

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Employers aren't impressed when candidates know nothing about the company's values, services, or products. We've said it before, but it bears repeating: Companies want to know you're passionate about the work they do. That means if you go into the interview with a vague sense of what the company offers, you might not receive a call back.

You don't have to know everything about the company, but get a solid understanding of what they do before you go to your interview. A little research will help you navigate those tricky questions like, "Why do you want to work for us?" The more information you have about the company, the more authentically you can answer those types of questions.

3. List the Questions You Have and Bring Them to the Interview

Asking thoughtful questions is the best way to show an employer that you care about getting the job, that you've been engaged during the entire interview, and that you want to learn more about what it would be like to work for the company.

While you don't want to robotically read your questions from a list, it doesn't hurt to jot down a few key inquiries so that you'll have a reference point to ground you in case your mind goes blank in a moment of nervousness.

Keeping these tips in mind will help you prepare for your next interview. If you're still in doubt and need a little extra interview help, consider calling a career consultant.

Savannah Ober is a resume expert at ResumeSpice.