App helps save Seattle man after heart attack

Features Associated Press

  • Stephen DeMont, center, embraces Madeline Dahl as Zach Forcade looks on at the University of Washington Medical Center Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016, in Seattle. When DeMont collapsed at a bus stop in front of the UW Medical Center days earlier on his morning commute, Dahl was one of 41 people within a 330-yard radius who happened to have a cell phone app alerting them to the emergency. Forcade, a medical student, witnessed the collapse and rushed over to begin chest compressions, as within moments Dahl, a cardiac nurse just getting off her shift in the hospital, was alerted by her phone and sprinted down the sidewalk, assisting until paramedics arrived. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

    Stephen DeMont, center, embraces Madeline Dahl as Zach Forcade looks on at the University of Washington Medical Center Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016, in Seattle. When DeMont collapsed at a bus stop in front of the UW Medical Center days earlier on his ... morning commute, Dahl was one of 41 people within a 330-yard radius who happened to have a cell phone app alerting them to the emergency. Forcade, a medical student, witnessed the collapse and rushed over to begin chest compressions, as within moments Dahl, a cardiac nurse just getting off her shift in the hospital, was alerted by her phone and sprinted down the sidewalk, assisting until paramedics arrived. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson) (The Associated Press)

  • Madeline Dahl, left, looks on as Zach Forcade, right, pulls out his cell phone while Stephen DeMont sits with them while being interviewed at the University of Washington Medical Center Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016, in Seattle. When DeMont collapsed at a bus stop in front of the UW Medical Center days earlier on his morning commute, Dahl was one of 41 people within a 330-yard radius who happened to have a cell phone app alerting them to the emergency. Forcade, a medical student, witnessed the collapse and rushed over to begin chest compressions, as within moments Dahl, a cardiac nurse just getting off her shift in the hospital, was alerted by her phone and sprinted down the sidewalk, assisting until paramedics arrived. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

    Madeline Dahl, left, looks on as Zach Forcade, right, pulls out his cell phone while Stephen DeMont sits with them while being interviewed at the University of Washington Medical Center Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016, in Seattle. When DeMont collapsed at a ... bus stop in front of the UW Medical Center days earlier on his morning commute, Dahl was one of 41 people within a 330-yard radius who happened to have a cell phone app alerting them to the emergency. Forcade, a medical student, witnessed the collapse and rushed over to begin chest compressions, as within moments Dahl, a cardiac nurse just getting off her shift in the hospital, was alerted by her phone and sprinted down the sidewalk, assisting until paramedics arrived. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson) (The Associated Press)

  • Stephen DeMont, center, gets a hug from medical student Zach Forcade, right, as nurse Madeline Dahl looks on as they visit DeMont Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016 at the University of Washington Medical Center, in Seattle. When DeMont collapsed at a bus stop in front of the UW Medical Center days earlier on his morning commute, Dahl was one of 41 people within a 330-yard radius who happened to have a cell phone app alerting them to the emergency. Forcade witnessed the collapse and rushed over to begin chest compressions, as within moments Dahl, a cardiac nurse just getting off her shift in the hospital, was alerted by her phone and sprinted down the sidewalk, assisting until paramedics arrived. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

    Stephen DeMont, center, gets a hug from medical student Zach Forcade, right, as nurse Madeline Dahl looks on as they visit DeMont Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016 at the University of Washington Medical Center, in Seattle. When DeMont collapsed at a bus stop ... in front of the UW Medical Center days earlier on his morning commute, Dahl was one of 41 people within a 330-yard radius who happened to have a cell phone app alerting them to the emergency. Forcade witnessed the collapse and rushed over to begin chest compressions, as within moments Dahl, a cardiac nurse just getting off her shift in the hospital, was alerted by her phone and sprinted down the sidewalk, assisting until paramedics arrived. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson) (The Associated Press)

If you're going to have a heart attack, right outside a hospital is not a bad place to do it.

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And it's even better if 41 people within a 330-yard radius have a cellphone app alerting them to your distress.

That's what happened in Seattle last week when 60-year-old Stephen DeMont collapsed at a bus stop in front of University of Washington Medical Center.

While a medical student rushed over and began chest compressions, a cardiac nurse just getting off her shift at the hospital was alerted by her phone, sprinted outside and assisted until paramedics arrived.

Five days later, DeMont is walking, smiling and talking about how the PulsePoint app helped save his life.

Seattle officials say the rescue shows the potential the free download has for connecting CPR-trained citizens with patients who urgently need their help.

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The app is being used in 2,000 U.S. cities in 28 states.

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