• FILE - in this July 8, 2014, file photo, Sen. James Inhofe, R-Okla., speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. Inhofe, who will take over the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee in January, said in a statement late Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2104, that a stricter standard to be announced Wednesday by the Obama administration on smog-forming pollution allowed in the air "will lower our nation's economic competitiveness and stifle job creation for decades." He vowed "vigorous oversight" of the proposal in his new position. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

    FILE - in this July 8, 2014, file photo, Sen. James Inhofe, R-Okla., speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. Inhofe, who will take over the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee in January, said in a statement late Tuesday, Nov. 25,... 2104, that a stricter standard to be announced Wednesday by the Obama administration on smog-forming pollution allowed in the air "will lower our nation's economic competitiveness and stifle job creation for decades." He vowed "vigorous oversight" of the proposal in his new position. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this June 2, 2014 file photo, a hill of coal is seen at the North Omaha Station, a coal-burning power station, in Omaha, Neb. The Environmental Protection Agency will announce Wednesday, Nov. 26, a preferred range of 65 to 70 parts per billion to reduce the amount of smog-forming pollution allowed in the air, people familiar with the proposal told The Associated Press. The agency's scientific advisers had endorsed a standard as low as 60 parts per billion. The current standard is 75 parts per billion, put in place by President George W. Bush in 2008. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)

    FILE - In this June 2, 2014 file photo, a hill of coal is seen at the North Omaha Station, a coal-burning power station, in Omaha, Neb. The Environmental Protection Agency will announce Wednesday, Nov. 26, a preferred range of 65 to 70 parts per ... billion to reduce the amount of smog-forming pollution allowed in the air, people familiar with the proposal told The Associated Press. The agency's scientific advisers had endorsed a standard as low as 60 parts per billion. The current standard is 75 parts per billion, put in place by President George W. Bush in 2008. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File) (The Associated Press)

AP sources: In another move aimed at air quality, govt to propose a stricter smog standard

Economic Indicators Associated Press

The stricter smog standard proposed by the Obama administration joins a string of historic — and controversial — moves by the administration to improve air quality.

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People familiar with the proposal tell The Associated Press that the Environmental Protection Agency is expected to announce Wednesday a preferred range of 65 to 70 parts per billion to reduce the amount of smog-forming pollution allowed in the air.

The agency's scientific advisers had endorsed a standard of 60 parts per billion. The current standard is 75 parts per billion, put in place by President George W. Bush in 2008.

Those familiar with the proposal were not authorized to discuss it by name ahead of the official announcement and spoke on condition of anonymity.