FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013, file photo, Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheeler testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Should the company that supplies your Internet access be allowed to cut deals with online services like Netflix, Skype or YouTube to move their content faster? That’s the question the FCC is tackling this fall after a record-setting 3.7 million people filed public comments on the subject, more than twice as many as those submitted to the regulatory agency after Janet Jackson’s infamous wardrobe malfunction at the 2004 Super Bowl. Wheeler, a former industry lobbyist and venture capitalist, says deal cutting between broadband providers and content sites might be OK so long as the agreement is “commercially reasonable” and companies disclose publicly how they prioritize Internet traffic. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013, file photo, Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheeler testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Should the company that supplies your Internet access be allowed to cut deals with online ... services like Netflix, Skype or YouTube to move their content faster? That’s the question the FCC is tackling this fall after a record-setting 3.7 million people filed public comments on the subject, more than twice as many as those submitted to the regulatory agency after Janet Jackson’s infamous wardrobe malfunction at the 2004 Super Bowl. Wheeler, a former industry lobbyist and venture capitalist, says deal cutting between broadband providers and content sites might be OK so long as the agreement is “commercially reasonable” and companies disclose publicly how they prioritize Internet traffic. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File) (The Associated Press)

INFLUENCE GAME: What US regulators, big business have to do with binge-watching on Netflix

Government And Institutions Associated Press

Should the company that supplies your Internet access be allowed to cut deals with online services such as Netflix, Amazon or YouTube to move their content faster?

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The Federal Communications Commission is tackling the question this fall after the public submitted a record 3.7 million comments on the subject.

That's more than double the number filed after Janet Jackson's infamous wardrobe malfunction at the 2004 Super Bowl.

Agency chairman Tom Wheeler says that financial arrangements between broadband providers and content sites might be OK so long as the agreement is "commercially reasonable" and if companies disclose publicly how they prioritize Internet traffic.

But not everyone agrees.

Netflix and much of the public accuse the FCC of handing the Internet over to the highest bidders.